Chronicon Rusticum-commerciale: Or, Memoirs of Wool, &c. Being a Collection of History and Argument, Concerning the Woolen Manufacture and Woolen Trade in General ... Also an Account of the Several Laws, from Time to Time Made, and of Many Schemes Offered, for Preventing the Exportation of Raw Wool ... With Occasional Notes, Dissertations, and Reflections Upon the Whole, Volume 2

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T. Osborne, 1747 - Wool
 

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Page 267 - From the foregoing state, it is observable that there are more trades carried on and manufactures set up in the Provinces on the continent of America to the northward of Virginia, prejudicial to the trade and manufactures of Great Britain, particularly in New England, than in any other of the British Colonies...
Page 75 - ... the united kingdom of Great Britain shall from and after the union have full freedom and intercourse of trade and navigation to and from any port or place within the said united kingdom and the dominions and plantations thereunto belonging, and that there be a communication of all other rights, privileges and advantages which do or may belong to the subjects of either kingdom, except where it is otherwise expressly agreed in these articles.
Page 265 - The Governor writes, concerning the woolen manufacture, that the country people, who used to make most of their clothing out of their own wool, do not now make a third part of what they wear, but are mostly clothed with British manufacture.
Page 30 - Ireland, which is dependent on, and protected by England, in the enjoyment of all they have, and which is so proper for the linen manufacture, the establishment and growth of which there would be so enriching to themselves, and so profitable to England, should of late apply itself to the woollen manufacture, to the great prejudice of the trade of this kingdom; and so unwillingly promote the linen trade, which would benefit both nations. That the consequence thereof would necessitate his majesty's...
Page 310 - We can fairly aver that a reduction of wages in the woolen manufacture would be a national blessing and advantage, and no real injury to the poor. By this means we might keep our trade, uphold our rents, and reform the people into the bargain.
Page 194 - As if this nation was never to want a set of men to undo her," complained the indignant weavers, " no sooner were the East India chints and printed calicoes prohibited from abroad, but some of Britain's unnatural children, whom we call Drapers, set all their arts to work to evade the law of prohibition, to employ people to mimick the more ingenious Indians, and to legitimate the grievance by making it a manufacture.
Page 30 - That they could not without trouble observe, that Ireland, which is dependent on, and protected by England, in the enjoyment of all they have, and which is so proper for the linen manufacture, the establishment and growth of which there would be so enriching to themselves, and...
Page 267 - ... with ours, they have no staple commodities of their own growth to exchange for our manufactures, which puts them under greater necessity, as well as under greater...
Page 265 - That thefe Settlements, which were diftant from Water Carriage, and remotely fltuated in the Woods, had no Opportunities of a Market for Grain, and therefore as they did not raife more Corn than was fufficient for their own Ufe, they had the more Time to manufacture both Wool and Flax for the Service of their Families, and...
Page 265 - The Governor of Massachusetts Bay informed us that in some parts of this Province the inhabitants worked up their wool and flax into an ordinary coarse cloth for their own use, but did not export any.

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