The Cinema of Québec: Masters in Their Own House

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 1995 - Performing Arts - 599 pages
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Quebecois cinema, too long neglected and too long unknown by American viewers, and often not appreciated on its own terrain, receives its well-deserved defense in Janis L. Pallister's The Cinema of Quebec: Masters in Their Own House.
According to Pallister, the neglect of quebecois cinema comes through ignorance, sometimes to be attributed to the whims of distributors. She intends that this study will redeem quebecois cinema and restore its status as an overlooked cinematic jewel, to be valued for its own beauty. Major films, including Mon oncle Antoine, Les bons debarras, Le Declin de l'empire americain, Jesus de Montreal, Pouvoir intime, Un Zoo la nuit, Les fous de Bassan, J.A. Martin, photographe, as well as many other lesser-known works, are dealt with exhaustively. In addition, the gynefilms of Lea Pool and such women directors' films as Mourir a tue-tete and Sonatine, are amply discussed. Additionally, films about quebecois history and politics, films taken from the literature of Quebec, films about the quebecois society, documentary films, animated films - all aspects and genres of the cinematic arts as practiced in Quebec have a place in the author's work.
Pallister treats the film production of Quebec from a historico-aesthetic perspective, but also pays attention to the historical, social, and political context in which this cinematic corpus was made. Although the book is largely concerned with films by French-speaking filmmakers, there is also a brief chapter on films in other languages, especially English.
 

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The cinema of Québec: masters in their own house

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Here Pallister (Aime Cesaire, Twayne, 1992) analyzes individual films produced before 1991 in varying detail, grouping the films in five subject categories: those that search for roots in Quebec's ... Read full review

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It is hard to trust any information from a book with obvious lack of care for accuracy. Page 464, of the three distinct topographical regions only two are named. List of important rivers leaves out the most important, the Richelieu, water route to New York!!!

Contents

I
3
II
39
III
93
IV
147
V
229
VI
305
VII
399
VIII
447
IX
459
X
467
XI
513
XII
541
XIII
571
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Page 9 - ... and with the minds, hands, and tools of long-departed craftsmen. It was a slow, arduous, and humbling quest that will never end for me or for anyone who loves history and old buildings. Many people have pursued that quest over the past forty years. A glance at the bibliography at the end of this book will hint at the effort and intelligence that were focused on old buildings during the last decades of the twentieth century. Collectively, these sources are the fruit of immense labor, the distillation...

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About the author (1995)

Janis L. Pallister is Distinguished University Professor of Romance Languages at Bowling Green State University, where she has taught and researched since 1961. A native of Rochester, Minnesota, she received her education at the University of Wisconsin, the University of Minnesota, and the Sorbonne. She is the author of many articles and reviews of literature and film, and of some thirty books, two of which are about film - The Cinema of Quebec (1995), supported by a fellowship from the Canadian Government, and French-Speaking Women Film Directors: A Guide. Pallister has translated women's literary works, including those of George Sand, Anne Hebert, and Joyce Mansour.

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