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bound, cheerfully and promptly to comply with all the fact is far otherwise; for all has been accomplished pod and wholesome regulations.

many times, and, (when the session has not been less To carry out the forms of a systematic organization, than ten working days,) by a due observance of puncI would recommend the early appointment of a secretary tuality, and also economy in time, even more has fre- ad assistant, to enroll the names of members and keep quently been done.

general outline or synopsis of the exercises and busi If the board of Instruction are working men them

ess transactions; and also, the raising of the following selves, an Institute will be found no place for idleness. e ommittees :

It is understood, as a matter of course, that the greatest. 1st. A committee to see that the room or place of improvement, is here expected to be made, according to Jeeting, is kept in order and furnished with fuel, lights, the time allowed. To preserve uniformity in the distri

bution of time, no one exercise should, ordinarily exceed 2d. A committee on music, that the board of instruc-thirty-five minutes. Four of these can be taken up during ion may know on whom to call, and suffer no loss of each half day, and leave time for two recesses of ten ime by delays.

minutes each, with sufficient opportunity for miscella3d. A committee to draft and present resolutions forneous remarks by the instructors. By a strict adherence -.ction at the close of the Institute.

to this arangement, the whole course proposed, may 4th. A committee to attend to the financial concerns, during eight days, be completed in a pretty thorough hat is, to receive and pay out monies for such contin- manner, leaving two days, or their equivalent, for the gent expenses as are taxable in common on those in at- transaction of all business matters, and ample time for cendance.

such remarks and suggestions on the teachers profession 5th. A committee of publication, in case a catalogue and duties, as the instructors may think beneficial, of names with the resolutions are ordered to be printed. In carrying out the daily, reviews, it is desirable to

These several committees can attend to the duties avoid as far as possible, taking up any two exercises in assigned them without the loss of one scientific exercise succession on the same topic; for example, during the y the Institute, and when promptly and faithfully dis- first half day, take the 1st. exercise on the elements, charged the session winds up in good order, with all its the 1st. on orthography, the 1st on arithmetic, and perbusiness concerns duly closed.

haps the 1st. on English grammar; or select from other

branches at pleasure, and thus proceed in a similar DUTIES OF THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION.

change of topics under review from day to day. The first duty of the Board of instruction after the In relation to the above course, I have only to say, it organization is completed, is to establish a systematic is the result of actual experience and not of theory, and course of exercises to be carried out in the daily reviews. in every instance where it has been adopted, I have Those branches which are of indispensable importance been gratified to witness the following result: to be thoroughly understood by the common school 1st. The satisfaction manifested by the members, as teacher, and to which the attention of the Institute to the mode in which the institute has been conducted, should first be directed, are the elements of the language, exhibiting a fair model specimen of order, of close aporthography, reading, arithmetic, English grammar and plication and systematic instruction. geography. These being the main branches in a common 2d. That a routine of topics always gave more life school education, should under no circumstances be and animation to the exercises, not only creating, but slightly passed over in the drills of an Institute. fully sustaining a good degree of interest up to the very ILLUSTRATION OF THE COURSE OF EXERCISES. close of the session. For the sake of illustrating the routine of such a provements were actually made in each branch to which

3d. That more was accomplished, and greater imcourse of exercises in an Institute, as I would recom- their attention was called, and mend, let us suppose the organization takes place on

4th. That the members of the institute separated, Monday, and the exercises commence on Tuesday morn-well satisfied with the advantages they had enjoyed, ing, to be closed on Friday evening of the following and at the same time, manifesting a desire that another week. This will give you ten working days. I would opportunity for similar instruction might again be offered. now suggest, that the number of exercises assigned to each of the above named branches, should in the main,

OF THE EVENING SESSIONS. be somewhat like the following synopsis :

These I consider an important and profitable appendOn the elements of language and correct articulation,

age

to the institute. If the term for continuing the sir exercises during the session.

sessions is ten days, five public lectures are all that On orthography and modes of teaching the same, should be admitted, let these be strictly confined to eduthree.

cational topics. The remaining evenings can be devoted On reading and rules for the same, five.

to nothing more beneficial than the discussion of quesOn mental arithmetic, seven, or more.

tions relating to school discipline, and listening to the On written arithmetic, seventeen at least; viz: one on detailed experiencc of the older and more successful what precedes the simple rules, one on the simple rules laborers in the profession. Each hour thus spent, may with illustrations of the fundamental principles of the be worth years of personal experience to the young science. One on denominate numbers in general. One teacher, and contribute greatly to his success in imparon decimal, and three on vulgar fractions. Two on pro- ting knowledge to his own pupils. portions, and two on interest and discount. One on in

THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. volution of all powers, and one on the square root and its ipplications. One or two, as may be necessary, on the On this point I must be allowed to speak plainly and ube root, one miscellaneous exercise in which the frankly, for it is the available advantages sought from nembers can propose for solution any difficulties of the institute itself I am advocating; and I do not hesiactual occurrence in their own experience, and one on tate to say, when teachers of a county are assembled podes of teaching

under favorable circumstances for holding an institute, In English grammar one, in definitions and explana- any failure in securing the benefits contemplated by ions of principles three, in analysing sentences five, in such an organization, is mainly if not wholly chargeable ritical parsing, and one on methods of teaching. on the board of instruction. The choice of men in all

In geography two thorough exercises on the use of respects duly qualified in tact, talent and learning, is le globe, one in geographical definitions, six on outline the most difficult, as well as the most important preparalaps, one general and miscellaneous, and one on modes | tory measure in the arrangements. There is no want of i teaching geography: In all cases, commence with men abundantly competent in a literary point of view; le elements of each branch and pursue a systematic but in conducting an institute successfully, this is by no

means sufficient. Experience has in all cases most At first view, it might seem impossible to do anything clearly shown, that the main benefits derivable from se justice to the entire course as here proposed. But these conyentions, are almost wholly dependent on the

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skill and ability of those who manage and direct the DISTRICT SCHOOL JOURNAL exercises. The reasons are perfectly obvious. For, as “teachers Institutes" are voluntary associations where each individual feels at liberty to remain or withdraw ALBANY, MARCH 1, 1849. at pleasure, there can be little hope in holding them in attendance, during any considerable portion of the session, unless a good degree of interest is created in con F We yield this number of the Journal almost er ducting the several exercises, and the members become clusively to the report of the Executive of the State Nor satisfied that personal advantages will be gained by mal School, the accompanying documents of the Stax their continuance.

There are always many talented, shrewd and discern- Superintendent's Report, and the Index to the volume ing teachers found in every institute, not only expe- Several articles are consequently crowded out, for which rienced but well informed. Such are by no means slow in discerning the capabilities of the board of instruction, we will find room in the next number. and in judging whether they themselves will or will not be benefited by attendance.

OFFICIAL. No man is aware of the tax laid on his intellectual

SECRETARY'S OFFICE, resources, nor the constant draft on his skill and talent

DEPARTMENT OF COMMON Schools. for conducting a “teachers' institute” to the satisfaction and profit of the members, till he has made the experi

Albany, Feb. 13, 1849. ment. Hence, in addition to adequate literary attain The Superintendent of Common Schools, in the mone ments, the following qualifications must also be sought of December, 1847, added $10,000 to the apportionne

1st. The ability to gain the confidence and command of school moneys to be distributed among the sever the respect of the institute.

counties of this state. The new apportionment being 2d. The faculty of awakening such an interest as will made too late to enable the Boards of Supervisors secure strict attention to the exercises, not only sustain-raise an equal sum at their sessions in 1847, the de ing, but giving it more and more intensity from day to ciency for that year was directed to be added to t day up to the very closing hour of the session.

amount raised in 1848. In the following table the name 3a. The instructors should have a ready tact in giving of the counties which have failed to raise the requisi a favorable turn to every incidental occurrence that may sum, are given; the first column of figures shows the nappen, in order to promote and preserve the best state amount of public money appropriated to each county of feeling among the members themselves.

1847 ; the second column shows the amount apportione 4th. They must always be ready to avail themselves in 1846 ; the third column shows the deficiency whid of circumstances, judiciously to interpose the daily ex- should have been added to the apportionment for 184 ercises with brief remarks pertinent to the occasion, The counties of Delaware, Genesee, Niagara, Putna and interesting and profitable to the institute.

and Stuben, have raised a sum equal to the apportionnel 5th. They must closely watch the state of interest of 1846, and the deficiency for said counties is given manifested in every exercise, and if indications of dull- the fourth column of figures. ness or decline are discoverable, give a recess, or change The Superintendent of Common Schools and the Com the topic at once.

troller, pursuant to Nos. 23 & 24, School Laws of 181 Such qnalifications in a board of instructions may be having duly considered the case of the said countig considered the main, if not the only guaranty of a pleasant have determined that all the said delinquent count and profitable session.

shall this year receive the sums respectively apportid

ed to them. CLOSING AN INSTITUTE.

But the Boards of Supervisors of the counties of Del I would advise the closing exercise always to be held ware, Genesee, Niagara, Putnam and Steuben, are he: in the evening. There is something in the time which required at the next annual meeting of said Board to r gives more durability to the impressions, and the eve in addition to the apportionment of 1847, the sam ning usually calls out a larger audiance. If the board opposite to the said counties in the fourth column of fi of instruction, can make arrangements satisfactory, to ures, and the other counties are required to raise, in the members of the institute, and have the following dition to said apportionment, the sums set opposite exercises at the closing session, the members will sepa-them respectively, in the third column of figures. rate with the best state of feelings, and the audience And if said counties, or either of them, fail to a be more favorably impressed with the utility of such the said deficiencies, the amount thereof shall be delt conventions.

ed from the public money of the counties so failing, 1st. Declamation by two of the young men.

the apportionment for next year diminished by a 2d. The reading of a paper got up by the institute, equal to the amount of the deficiency. containing anonymous cominunications, correspondence, news of the day, &c. &c. prepared by the members,

Arportion't Apportion't and placed in the hands of a committee of editors to

eieny. assort and arrange, with the privilege of rejecting such

Broome, pieces as they consider unsuitable or inappropriate.

$2,824 07 $2,724 15

5,434 43 5,241 94 3d. A valedictory address from one of the members Columbia,

4,593 27 4,430 76 chosen by the institute.

2,744 52 4th. Remarks from any of the citizens who choose.

Delaware,

4,047 68 Erie,

8,604 73 8,300 00 5th. Closing remarks from the board of instructors.

Franklin,

2,045 39 1,973 02 Genesee,

3,156 40 3,044 45

Hamilton,
Sincerely and respectfully yours, &c.

Jefferson,

7,112 59 6,860 97 S. TOWN. Monroe,

7,758 21 December 15th, 1849.

Niagara,

3,780 68 3,646 91 133 77 Orange,

5,715 00 5,513 10 Orleans,

2,928 12 F Subscriptions closing with the present volume, Otscgo,

Oswego,

5,113 68 187 03

5,527 01 should be renewed without delay.

1,450 77 Schenectady,

1,819 76 1,755 36 St. Lawrence,

6.823 16 6,581 76 Steuben,

5,655 04 Town Superintendents, who have not reported Warren, the address for the several districts under their charge, CHRISTOPHER MORGAN, Supt. Common 3 will confer a favor by doing so as soon as possible.

MILLARD FILLMORE, Comptroller.

Counties

Defi

of 1847.

of 1846.

Cayuga,

Cortland.

2,647 50
3,904 48

$99 92
192 19
162 51

97 02
143 20
304 73

72 37 111 95

7 36 251 62 274 75

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205 94

198 58

7,483 46

2,728 06

202 90
100 06

5,300 71

5,331 21
1.399 44

Putnam,

195 90 51 33 64 10 211 40 199 91 57 45

1.631 33

5,455 03
1.573 88

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PROSE.
A.

H.

Page.
Address to the teachers of Monroe County,

Horace Mann, ...

30 16 Address, by James M. Winchell,

Home preparation for school,

.53, 69 27

How to teach children,
Address, by Prof. George R. Perkins,

59
Ardent spirits and tobacco,
30

90

How to interest scholars,
A bad room for hearing,

57

I & J.
A thought for every day,
58 Importance of educating the farmer,

58
A moral, well pointed,
75 | Intellectual reading,

59 A beautiful figure, 107 | Ira Mahew's letter, .

105 Address, by Amos Dean, 119 | Ingenuity of science,

106 Acquired talent, 138 | Importance of punctuality,

136 Annual Report of the Executive Committee of the

Idleness,

139 State Normal School,... 181 John Quincy Adains,

31 B.

K.
Boards of Education, their Origin, Constitution, and

Kind words do not cost much,

58 Objects,

73

L.
Back numbers of the District School Journal, 77 Long articles, ...

15 Books,

103 List of graduates of State Normal School, March C. 30th, 1848,

27 County and State Certificates,!. 31 Letter from Salem Town,..

50, 103 City of Buffalo, 62 Lamartine's education, ..

58 Consolation in teaching,

89
Little kindnesses,

158 Children should be taught to think for themselves,

91

M.
Cultivate energy,
104 Mission of the teacher.

33
Connecticut Commissioner,
105 | Mathematics,

63 Cruelty to children, 109 Methods of teaching,

92 Common Schools, 138 Moral influence of music,

134 County Superintendents,

179

N.
Communication from S. Town, Esq., on the subject NOTICES OF BOOKS.
of Teachers' Institutes,

190

Twenty Ninth Annual Report of the New York D.

Institution for the Education of the Deaf
District School Journal,

15
and Dumb,

18 Drawing,

16 Twelfth Annual Report of the Institution for Decisions of the Superintendent,

17
the Blind, .

18
Duty to elevate the Common School,
63 Ollendorfi's Spanish Language,

19 Duty of Goverments and States,

139 Ryerson's Report on Elementary Instruction in E. Upper Canada,

49 Editor's table, .18, 33, 49, 64, 78, 93, 128, 143

Town's First, Third and Fourth Reader and Educational lessons from Europe,

49 Analysis,

29 Education, by H. N. Hudson,

50 37

Fulton's Chirographic Chart,
Educators,

Fulton's Book Keeping,

50 Examination of the Canada Normal School,

50 62

History of England,
Education, promotive of civil liberty, .

50 63

Webster's Dictionary,
Effects of American Education,

64
104
Sweet's Teachers' Institutes,

64 Energy,..

138 Biographical School Lines, Education of Idiots,

142

Life and opinions of Julius Melbourne, 64 Emphasising words,

44

Ceasar's Commentaries and the Germania and
Agricola of Tacitus,

65
F.
Grammatic Guide, .

65 Family and social reading,

78
Truth and Trust,

65 Female culture,

155
First lessons on Natural Philosophy,

65 Friendship,

155
Universal Pronouncing Gazetteer,

65 Free schools in the Town of Niagara,

184
Principles of Zoology,

65
G.
Wilson's Book Keeping,

65 Government and teachers,

59 American Quarterly Register and Magazine, 81, 129
60
American Speaker,

81
Getting good by doing good,
76 Arithmetical Investigator,

81 89 Life and Times of Silas Wright,

96 Graduates of colleges,

110
Modern French Literature,

97 Graduates of the State Normal School,

125 Chamber's Miscellany for Young People,..... 97

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58

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Good sense,

Good manners,

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Page.

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Women of the American Revolution, 113 Report of William B. Kirk, Indian Agent of the On-
Spark's Analysis of the French Verbs,

113
ondaga Reservation,

139
Fourteenth Report of the Commissioners of

s.
National Education in Ireland,.

159
School Architecture,

State Normal School Examination,

..21, 117
160
American Manual,
Standing District Clerks,

30
161
Spelling,

46
Principles of Civil Government,

161
Schools in Indiana,

62
School Dialogues,

161
Modern Geography,
Smithsonian Institute,

72
162
An Etymological Dictionary,
School teaching, profanity,

78
162
Normal School report,

School Celebration at Wampsville,

96
5
Sound mind, .

104
New-York State Teachers' Association,.

62
School discipline,

125
New words,

106
Sorrows of a child,

140
New-York State Normal School,

150
Sphere of human influence,

153
Normal College for Wales,..

184
School laws,

178
0.

T.
OFFICIAL DECISIONS AND NOTICES.

The school department,

15
Tax of the Auburn and Syracuse Railroad

Town superintendent should be empowered to ad-
minister oaths,

16
Company,

17
District School Journal,

Teachers' Institute,..

19, 45, 158
17
Teachers' wages,
The spirit of the true scholar,

28
17
County and State Certificates,
Touching anecdote, .

23
31
Teachers' Institutes,
Tioga County Teachers' Association,.

30
Blank reports,....
The new edition of Webster's dictionary,

39
63
Town Superintendents,
True basis of education,.

44
78
Political Advertisements,.
The teacher and the soldier,

45
91
Appeal of Theodore Hoffman,
The nautilus,

59
110
Employment of colored teachers,
The teacher's reward,

62
156
County Clerk's Returns,
The figure mine,

74
156
Removal of the publishing office,
The mother,

75
179
Deficiencies in certain counties,
The ruling passion,

76
192
Origin and progress of arithmetic,

The School System in Michigan,

77
43
Official notices,

79
47, 63, 78, 91, 110, 132, 156, 179 The Journal of Education for Upper Canada,
Ohio State Normal Class,

Troy Female Seminary,

80
79
Orthography,

The Daily Governess,

87
110
Our wondrous atmosphere,

101
Teaching and learning,

103
Organization of schools,

103
The power of America,
138

The
Obituary,

105
tongue,
179
The mischievous boy,

107
P.
Tale bearing in school,

107
Postage on District School Journal,
30 Teach your children music,

107
Paper,

107
Professor Agassiz,

44 The manner of doing service to others,
75 Two ways of correcting a fault,

133
Palmyra Union School,
76 Teachers’ Seminaries,

156
Philosophy of a tear,
102 The teacher's home and politics,

149
Premature education,

136 | The teacher's ability and duty to aid the parent,.... 155
Prussia,

139
Parents should visit the school,

U.
154
United States School Agency,

79
R.
Reward of literature,

Unreported towns,

156
32

V.
Rights of labour,

137
Result of habit and industry,

Value of knowledge,

85
Revenge,

Value of education,
138

90

122
Report of the Superintendent of Common Schools, . 165 Valedictory address, by M. M. Greene,
Report of the County Superintendent of Common

Vulgarity of life,

155
Śchools for the city of New York,

185

W.
Report of Chester Howe, Indian Agent of the Alle What educates?

61
gany and Cattaraugus Reservations,
189 Will there be flowers in heaven?

108
Report of W. A. Wheeler, Agent of the St. Regis In Who educates your children ?

109
dians,
189! Winter schools,

141

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138

POETRY.

A.

All's for the best, by Tupper,

F.
Fearless and faithful, by J. C 0....
Fall of Grenada,
Freedom, by C. J. Smith,

G.
Good in evil, by W. H. McCalla,

K
Kindness,

M.
Page.

Page.
108 Meaning of words,

129

N.
23

Normal School Valedictory Poem, by R. B. Stetsor, 60
94
Never give up, by Tupper,

103
140

P.
Poem, by Miss E, C. Hance,

117
140 Parting hymn, by Ann J. Hawley,

122

W.
108 | Who are the truly great, by Mary L. Malory, .... 21

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