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AVERAGE COST OF TEMPORARY HOUSES

Mr. WOODRUM. What is the average cost of temporary houses?
Mr. EMMERICH. We have some information on that.
Mr. WOORKUM. Suppose you put in the record a general break-
down for all types of units.

Mr. EMMERICH. We will be glad to do that.
Mr. WOODRUM. Give us something in the record on that.
Mr. EMMERICH. Yes; we will do that.
(The statement above referred to follows:)

Cost data A. COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED AND ACTUAL AVERAGE TOTAL DEVELOPMENT COST PER DWELLING UNIT IN WAR HOUSING OF FEDERAL PUBLIC HOUSING AUTHORITY, BY TYPE

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1 Estimated at time of congressional hearings on second $600,000,000 appropriation under Lanbam Act. : For dwelling units awarded for contract during this period.

Final cost will be somewhat above this average because of additional project facilities, such as cafeterias, yet to be constructed for some of these projects. However, it is estimated that it will be substantially under the $1,200 estimate.

B. DETAILED BREAK-DOWN OF CAPITAL COST OF TYPICAL PUBLIC WAR HOUSING

ACCOMMODATIONS I

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1 In the preceding table we have presented data on actual cost based on construction contract awards in comparison with previous estimates, from which it can be seen that the two are very close. This table is a break-down of our estimates on typical types of units. * The figure shown in this column for building construction, including equipment covers all the items (except the allowance for contingencies on building construction and equipment) which are included in the Lanham Act under the limitation of an average cost per permanent family dwelling unit of $3,750, and the limitation that the cost of no family dwelling unit shall exceed $4,500. 3 This figure includes the cost of construction and equipment of common living spaces and eating facilities. * This figure represents the estimated average over-all cost, whether permanent or demountable.

C. DETAILED BREAK-DOWN OF CAPITAL COSTS OF TYPICAL PUBLIC WAR HOUSING

ACCOMMODATIONS IN THE DETROIT AREA

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I The dormitory projects in the Detroit area include the second largest dormitory project in the country. Consequently, the average cost per person will be somewhat lower than in the rest of the country.

NOTE.-The cost in any one area, such as Detroit, will naturally vary somewhat from the typical cost for the entire country as shown in table B above.

AMOUNT AVAILABLE FROM CONTRACTUAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Mr. FITZPATRICK. You have an unexpended balance of $5,600,000 for the present year.

Will you use all of the $6,000,000 you are asking for?

Mr. EMMERICH. Yes, sir. We will need the requested appropriation along with the carry-over to meet the contract obligations of the Government.

Mr. FITZPATRICK. That will make a total of $11,600,000?

Mr. EMMERICH. Yes, sir. Those are for our contractual contributions on the permanent low-cost housing program.

The United States Housing Act authorizes agreements for annual contributions aggregating $28,000,000 per year, but the amount needed for contributions has been cut for the duration because $258,000,000 of projects have been converted to war purposes. War workers pay economic rents and receive no contributions. This eliminates, for the duration, the need for annual contributions each year in the amount of about $8,200,000. One hundred and forty-four million dollars of projects and funds are held up for the duration, and disbursements are not now being made under contracts with local authorities for the construction of these projects. This results in a further reduction for the duration in the maximum amount of annual contributions needed each year in the amount of about $4,500,000.

Of the $28,000,000 authorized, this leaves $15,300,000, which is the maximum contribution on the $488,000,000 of projects which continue to be operated in accordance with the low-rent and slumclearance purposes of the United States Housing Act. Although the maximum contributiors payable for these projects is $15,300,000, it is estimated that the actual contributions to be paid for these projects in fiscal year 1944 will be only $11,600,000. This reduction is due to economies in operation and increased income of the projects. In view of the fact that these projects are completed, we believe this estimate is an accurate forecast of our actual needs to meet contract obligations.

FUNDS AVAILABLE FROM ALL SOURCES

Mr. DIRKSEN. What funds are available from all sources now, in = the current fiscal year?

Mr. EMMERICH. For dormitory housing?

Mr. DIRKSEN. No, for all types of construction. I would like to have a general idea.

Mr. ËMMERICH. On war housing, as of November 30, F. P. H. A. had a total of $1,516,000,000 available to it from all sources. This is the total size of the F. P. H. A. present war-housing program. For our public housing, other than war housing, the amount is $638,700,000.

Mr. WOODRUM. What would that consist of?

Mr. EMMERICH, That would consist of the United States Housing Authority fund, the value of the old P. W. A, housing assigned to us, is and the value of the Farm Security projects that came over to us under Executive order.

Mr. STARNES. That is housing already constructed?

Mr. EMMERICH. Yes. Are you referring to funds that have not been obligated?

I was giving you our complete picture.

Mr. WOODRUM. I think Mr. Wigglesworth asked for that table, did he not?

Mr. EMMERICH. I think he did.
Mr. FITZPATRICK. You will put that in the record, will you?
Mr. EMMERICH. Yes, we will be glad to do that.

The amount of our funds available for war-housing projects on which construction contracts had not been let on November 30, 1942, was about $367,100,000.

PUBLIC WAR HOUSING TRANSFERRED FROM PREDECESSOR AGENCIES

Mr. DIRKSEN. What did you inherit by way of projects from Defense Housing under the Federal Works Agency?

Mr. EMMERICH. I have not that broken down here by divisions.

Mr. DIRKSEN. I wonder if you cannot give us a statement in the record about that.

Mr. EMMERICH. We will be glad to supply that.

Mr. DIRKSEN. And also for defense housing projects under the PBA. Will you include that also?

Mr. EMMERICH. Yes, sir
Mr. DIRKSEN. They are all over the United States?
Mr. Emmerich. Yes, sir.
(The statement above referred to is as follows:)

Public war housing programed as of Feb. 28, 1942, transferred to Federal Public Housing Authority from predecessor agencies 1

Number of Agency from which transferred:

dwelling units Division of Defense Housing of the Federal Works Agency and miscellaneous assignments

70, 321 Public Buildings Administration,

39, 326

2

As provided in the Executive order, a number of projects transferred to the Federal Public Housing Authority which were under way were left with other agencies (Public Buildings Administration, Farm security Administration, War and Navy Departments) for completion as agents of the Federal Public Housing Authority; these projects are for the most part now completed and under management of the Federal Public Housing Authority. Includes family dwellings, trailers, portable houses, and dormitories. Includes assignments to the Tennessee Valley Authority, assignments directly to local housing author. ities, and assignments to the Alley Dwelling Authority. 81710_43

72

Public war housing programed as of Feb. 28, 1942, transferred to Federal Public Housing Authority from predecessor agencies—Continued

Number of Agency from which transferred-Continued.

dwelling units U. S. Housing Authority, subtotal.---

92, 566 Low-rent projects converted to war use

48, 385 Projects under defense amendment (Public, 671).

8, 069 Assignments from Federal Works Agency under nham Act. 36, 112 Defense Homes Corporation..

16, 439 War Department.

1, 320 Navy Department.

19, 920 Farm Security Administration.

32, 606 Mutual Ownership Defense Housing Division of the Federal Works Agency

6, 550

Total..

-3 279, 048 Less: Units transferred to or left under jurisdiction of War and Navy Departments.

4 11, 191 Total transferred to Federal Public Housing Authority ----- 267, 857 : of this total, 96,000 units had been programmed since Jan. 1, 1942, from new appropriations which had just become available. * Does not include units managed by Army and Navy on behalf of Nationai Housing Agency.

Mr. DIRKSEN. You have taken over the program for dormitories in the District of Columbia?

Mr. EMMERICH. In that case we have asked the P. B. A. to build and manage them for us. They have a staff here which they are using on this assignment.

REDUCTIONS OF UNITED STATES HOUSING AUTHORITY COMMITMENTS

Mr. DIRKSEN. You mentioned the fact that you tapered off on the USHA commitments and canceled some of those.

Mr. EMMERICH. We have suspended for the duration the construction of projects for nonwar purposes and are not making construction advances under our loan contracts with local authorities on these projects. Some earmarkings were canceled where no contract obligation was involved.

Mr. DIRKSEN. What was the aggregate of those cancelations?

Mr. EMMERICH. The whole USHA program of $800,000,000 of Federal funds and $90,000,000 of local was broken down as follows: $258,000,000 was converted to war purposes; $144,000,000 of projects covered by loan and annual contribution contracts are held up for the duration, and $488,000,000 of projects were completed and continue to be operated as low-rent, slum-clearance projects.

SUMMARY OF FEDERAL PUBLIC HOUSING AUTHORITY-AIDED HOUSING

PROJECTS

Mr. DIRKSEN Last year there appeared in the hearings at page 603 a statement running up to the 30th of November 1941, setting forth all the projects and locations. Has that changed materially since that time? I assume that a good many of those were nonwar projects.

Mr. EMMERICH. I think there has been a change because under Public, 671, we have been able to authorize a few projects for war purposes.

Mr. DIRKSEN. I wonder if you will take that table and bring it down to date and insert that in the record.

Mr. EMMERICH. We will be glad to do that. (The table referred to is as follows:)

Summary of Federal Public Housing Authority-aided developments under United States Housing Act (as of Aug. 28, 1949)

[Excludes Federal Public Housing Authority-aided defense, Public 673, and U. 8. Housing Authority-war priority projects) (NOTE.-Substantially all the projects covered by this table were completed at the time of the Housing Reorganization, when the functions of U. S. Housing Authority were transferred

to Federal Public Housing Authority] (FB-cost data based on final budget estimates; CA-cost data based on construction award estimates}

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