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in 1892, consisting of Mr. Gove of Colorado, Mr. Calkins of New York, Mr. Shepard of Minnesota, Mr. Greenwood of Missouri, and Mr. Canfield of Nebraska. The report of the committee to the Directors covered more points than are now submitted. The action of the Directors upon the report of their committee having been of this character, four propositions were discussed, and with slight amendments, were unanimously adopted for recommendation to this body. They are important recommendations. Some of those not presented seemed to require more time for their formulation, and they were referred back to the committee, with certain suggestions, and that committee is continued, and will, at some future time, a year hence or thereafter, report again to the Board of Directors on those points.

The Secretary will read to the association the provisions contained in the report of the committee. The report has been printed, and will be circulated for your consideration.

The Secretary read the following recommendation of the committee:

To the Board of Directors of the National Educational Association,

GENTLEMEN: Your committee, appointed July 14, 1892, to report recommendations for reorganizing the administration of the National Educational Association, beg leave to submit the following report:

We recommend that the constitution of the association be amended as follows: Article III.: Strike out sections 1, 2, and 3 and substitute as follows:

Section 1. There shall be three classes of members, namely, active, associate, and corresponding.

Sec. 2. Teachers and all who are actively associated with the management of educational institutions, including libraries and periodicals, may become active members. All others who pay an annual membership fee of two dollars may become associate members. Eminent educators not residing in America may be elected by the Directory to be corresponding members. The number of corresponding members shall at no time exceed fifty.

Sec. 3. All persons who have been members of the association for any two years previous to or including 1895 may be admitted to active membership withont payment of the enrollment fee. Any person eligible may become an active member upon application indorsed by two active members and the payment of an enrollment fee of two dollars.

All active members must pay annual dues of two dollars, and will be entitled to the volume of proceedings without "coupon" or other conditions. If the annual dues are not paid within the fiscal year, membership will lapse, and may be restored only on payment of the enrollment fee of two dollars.

Associate members may receive the volume of proceedings in accordance with the usual "coupon" conditions, as printed on the membership ticket.

Corresponding members will be entitled to the volume of proceedings without the payment of fees, or other conditions.

Sec. 4. The names of active and corresponding members only will be printed in the volume of proceedings with their respective educational titles, offices, and addresses, to be revised annually by the Secretary of the association.

President Butler explained the scope of the old constitution and the effect of the proposed amendment.

MR. SEELEY of New Jersey: I move the adoption of the amended Article III., as read by the Secretary.

Seconded by Mr. Cook of Illinois.

The amendment was discussed by Mr. McDonald of Kansas, Mr. Richards of Washington, and was thereafter unanimously adopted.

President Butler announced the vote as follows:

The chair hears no negative. The necessary two-thirds vote hav. ing been cast in the affirmative, the amendment is adopted.

Secretary Shepard read the proposed amendment to Article IV., as follows:

Amend Article IV. by striking out section 1 and inserting the following:

Section 1. The officers of this association shall consist of a President, twelve Vice Presidents, a Secretary, a Treasurer, a Board of Directors, a Board of Trustees, and an Executive Committee, as hereinafter provided.

President Butler explained the old constitution and the effect of the proposed amendment.

On motion of Mr. McDonald of Kansas, seconded by Mr. Buchanan of Missouri, the amendment was unanimously adopted.

President Butler announced the result of the vote as follows:

The chair hears no negative. The necessary two-thirds vote hav. ing been given in the affirmative, the amendment is adopted as reai.

Secretary Shepard read the following proposed amendment:

Further amend Article IV. by striking out section 2 and inserting the following:

Sec. 2. The Board of Directors shall consist of the President of the National Educational Association, First Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, and of one additional member from each state, territory, or district, to be elected by the association for a term of one year, or until their successors are chosen, and of such Life Directors as are now (July 12, 1895,) in office. The President of the National Educational Association, First Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Chairman of the Board of Trustees shall constitute the Executive Committee.

President Butler explained the scope of the old constitution and the effect of the proposed amendment.

On motion of Mr. Baldwin of Texas, seconded by Mr. Phillips of Alabama, the proposed amendment was unanimously adopted.

President Butler announced the result of the vote as follows:

The chair hears no negative. The required two-thirds vote having been cast in the affirmative, the amendment is adopted.

Secretary Shepard then read the following proposed amendment:

Further amend Article IV., section 3, by striking out the word "second" in the second line of the section and inserting the word “third."

President Butler explained the scope of the old constitution and the effect of the proposed amendment.

On motion of Mr. Bright of Illinois, seconded by several members, the proposed amendment was unanimously adopted.

President Butler announced the result of the vote as follows:

The chair hears no negative. The required two-thirds vote haying been cast in the affirmative, the amendment is adopted.

On motion, the recommendations of the Board of Directors, as severally adopted, were unanimously approved.

Adjourned to 8 p. m.

FOURTH SESSION.-WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 10TH.

The association was called to order by President Butler.
Music by the Principals' Male Quartette of Chicago.
Announcements by the Secretary.

PRESIDENT BUTLER: His Excellency ex-Governor Northen of Georgia is present as the official representative of the board of management of the Cotton States and International Exposition, which is to open at Atlanta in the month of September. In connection with the exposition, it is proposed to hold a series of educational congresses and an educational exhibit. I take pleasure in introducing to you ex-Governor Northen, who will address us briefly on the features of the exposition.

Ex-Governor Northen spoke as follows:

Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen of the Convention:

Whilst I profoundly appreciate the courtesy shown me by the President, I am at this juncture just a little regretful that I am interrupting the most pleasant part of your exercises. I desire to say, however, that I will not trespass upon the courtesies shown me by using more than eight or ten minutes of your time.

I ask to call your attention briefly to the Cotton States and International Exposition to be held in Atlanta.

I happen to be one of the directors of the exposition. The management has done me the very great honor to make me chief of the Department of Education, and they have conferred upon me the distinguished honor to bear to this assemblage of educators an invitation, not only to be present and look upon the material development of the Southern States as it will be largely displayed on that occasion, but especially to invite this association to hold an adjourned session of your organization during the time that we shall devote to the congresses of educators at Atlanta. I desire to extend to you, under the direction of the management, a twofold invitation. It has already been indicated to you by the President that we are to have an educational display at the exposition. The invitation I bear, therefore, is extended to you as the representatives of your individual institutions of learning, beginning with the common schools and extending to the high schools, the academies, the colleges, the universities, and, indeed, all institutions of learning that are engaged in the great cause you represent-teaching whatever makes for usefulness in citizenship and prepares students for the duties and obligations that devolve upon them as citizens of their respective commonwealths.

As a great aid to the work we have undertaken, you are invited, earnestly and cordially, to make displays of your school work, your systems and methods of teaching, and whatever else may occur to you as desirable to give out to the world, and especially to the people of the Southern States, a full, thorough, and complete understanding of your educational systems.

It may be proper for me to say, there will be no charge for space for any exhibit or display that is properly an exhibit of school work. Of course, parties who come for the purpose of advertisement and make display for the purpose of sale would be charged for the space they occury.

It is hardly necessary, I am sure, for me to tell you of the comprehensiveness of this exposition. You can gather information as to this from the literature that I have left at the office of the association at the Brown Palace Hotel. It is sufficient to say, that there will be displays from many foreign countries, in addition to those made by the States, and the general interest manifested has far exceeded our most sanguine expectations.

Now, as to the other part of the invitation, I want to say to you that it is most cordial. I am urged to present it with all the earnestness I can express. We invite you to come to Atlanta in a body and take part in the Congress of Education to be held during the exposition. The general management of the congress will be under the direction of the Commissioner of Education of the United States, Dr. Harris. I have had frequent correspondence with Dr. Harris, and he is in hearty sympathy with the movement. I would like, therefore, that the Program Committee, or your President, or whatever authority or department of this conven. tion has this matter in charge, would aid Dr. Harris in making a program for at least three days of the congress. The time of the congress will be extended over six days and I desire that this convention shall occupy three of these days, or two, at least, in the discussion of educational matters that pertain, mainly, to these interests at the South. I know it will not be in order that you should take action upon this matter this evening. I present the subject, however, for your consideration at the proper time, and I trust it will be your pleasure to give the invitation your favorable action. I present it at this time because my personal business compels me to return to my home at once.

I have had a most delightful experience since I have been here, and I have thoroughly enjoyed my visit to Denver. I shall carry from this place the most pleasant recollections of the people I have met and their kind and cordial words. I shall be more than glad to repeat them to my people when I return to Georgia.

I trust that your President will see fit to give such direction to this matter as will bring every one of you to Atlanta on the 25th of October, that you may enjoy a most cordial welcome from the people of my city and from the people of the South. I thank you.

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PRESIDENT BUTLER: It gives me great pleasure to express to Governor Northen the high appreciation in which we hold his cordial invitation. In order that it may receive the recognition which is its due, it will be referred for appropriate action to the Committee on Resolutions, and further, to the Board of Directors at their next session. In that way the attitude of this association toward the proposed exposition will be declared and such administrative steps as are necessary to participate therein will be entered upon in an orderly manner. We are indebted to Governor Northen for his presence, and we wish him a pleasant and safe return to his home.

It gives me great pleasure to present to this association one of its most honored members, Chancellor Payne of the University of Nashville.

Chancellor Payne addressed the association on "Education According to Nature."

Violin solo by Miss Genevra D. Waters of Denver.

Announcement by Chairman of the Committee of Colorado State Teachers' Association concerning a reception.

PRESIDENT BUTLER: The concluding address of the evening will be delivered by State Supt. Charles R. Skinner, a gentleman who has come to his high position with the unanimous approval of the teachers of the great State of New York.

State Superintendent Skinner spoke on the "Education of Public Opinion.”

Music by the Euterpe Quartette of Denver.
Adjourned to 9:45 a. m., July 11th.

THIRD DAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

FIFTH SESSION.-THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 11TH.

The fifth session was called to order at 9:45 a. m. by President Butler.

Organ recital by Mr. Henry Houseley.
Invocation by the Rev. Dr. Myron Reed of Denver.

PRESIDENT BUTLER: The constitutional order for consideration at this time is the report of the Committee on Nominations, which will be presented by the Chairman, Mr. E. W. Coy of Ohio.

Mr. Coy of Ohio presented the following report:

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS.

The Committee on Nominations unanimously recommend the following persons for officers of the association for the ensuing year: President. ...

Newton C. Dougherty. Peoria, Ill. First Vice President

Nicholas Murray Butler, New York City. Second Vice President..

Mrs. A. J. Peavey, Denver, Colo. Third Vice President.

W. H. Bartholomew, Louisville, Ky. Fourth Vice President.

N. C. Schaeffer, Harrisburg, Pa. Fifth Vice President.

W. N. Sheats. Tallahassee, Fla.

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