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POETRY.

[In Original Poetry, the Name, real or assumed, of the Author, is printed in small Capitals under the title ; in Selections it is printed in Italics at the end.]

THE PANGS OF MEMORY.

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Each beast and bird no longer mute,

In varied tones attune His praise ; Is man the most insensate brute,

Shall he no song of triumph raise ? Shout Britain shuut, with loud acclaim, The honours of God's blessed name.

A thousand glittering blades are lift,

With rustling music in their sound, And nature's wooed and bounteous gift

Falls a rich harvest on the ground. Dejection, grief, and fear are fled, And peace and plenty reign instead.

She leaned upon her harp and sighed, Deep thought had shadow'd o'er her

brow; In vain some lovely air she tried,

Each chord, alas ! was sorrow now. There was a time when ev'ry string

Would vibrate with her touch of joy : Then Hope was young and blossoming,

Then pleasure's dream had no alloy. But Hope and Pleasure quickly fled,

And left her but the wreck you see, Those early blossoms withered,

And what remains is misery.
The trembling strings too truly tell,

That memory is busy there.
And each soft note's melodious swell

Seems but the breathing of despair. Soham.

Soham Town's End.

THE THREE MANSIONS.

"O homeless and unsheltered head!"

Desponding pilgrim, weep not so: Three mansions are before you spread

To one you must, to all may go!

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60

Epilepsy ;
Gin, Anniseed

Brandy,
Rum, and Burglary ; Melancholy;

The Hulks.
Wiskey in

Madness;
the morning Murder; Palsy ;

Botany Bay.
Ditto, during

Apoplexy;
the Day and
Night.. SUICIDE; DEATH; GALLOWS.

" After this the Judgment.

70

MISCELLANY

AND EXTRACTS.

lr is pleasant to be virtuous and good, because that is to excel many others : it pleasant to grow better ; because that is to excel ourselves: it is pleasant even to mortify and subdue our lusts; because that is victory : it is pleasant to command our appetites and passions, and to keep them in due order, within the bounds of reason and religion ; because this is empire.

TIMOUR the Tartar exclaimed to the prostrate citizans of Damascus; “You behold me here, a poor, lame decrepid mortal. I am not a man of blood, and in all my wars I have never been the aggressor," Notwithstandnig this boast, millions of miserable victims were sacrificed at his command, and every great city of the east felt for years the loss of population. Human bodies, curiously piled to an immense height, marked the progress of his conquests; and two several pyramids on the road to Delhi, of one hundred thousand, and on the ruins of the venerable city of Bagdad, of ninety thousand heads, gratified his unnatural ferocity. The indignation of the Persians against the invaders, occasioned the murder of a few Moguls in the streets of Ispahan. But the conquered people repented their imperfect submission, and the skulls of seventy thousand Persians were piled in the forms of towers in the principal squares of the city.

Modern discoveries have taught us that the sea, the earth, the air the clouds, are replete with a subtile and penetrating matter, which, while at rest, gives us no disturbance; but when excited to action, turns into a consuming fire, which no substance can exclude, no force can resist : so that the “elements,” which are to “melt with fervent heat,” want no accidental matter to inflame them : Since all things may be burnt up by that matter which now resides within them, and is only waiting for the word from its Creator.

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Churchwardens and Overseers are to make out before the first day of September, a list of all persons qualified to serve on juries, and affix a copy of such list on the three first Sundays in September on the Church and Chapel doors.

1. On this day, until two Sundays have elapsed, Lists of objections to County Electors to be affixed to Church and Chapel doors.

Between Fifteenth of September and the last day of October, Revising Barristers to hold their Courts.

15. County Court held at Soham. All Plaints for this Court must entered by the 4th.

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MONG the many irresistible proofs of the truth of the Christian Religion, the literal fulfilment of prophecy, has ever claimed peculiar regard. To the pretended philosopher

who affects to treat Revelation as a fable, it offers a species of evidence which cannot be met by a sneer, for it is a plain matter of fact, open to the observation of the world. It has been said by Mr. Hume, “that the Christian Religion, even at this day, cannot be believed by any reasonable person, without a miracle.” Every prophecy is a miracle, and is even admitted to be such by this inconsistant writer; and yet, so great was his batred towards the truth, that he steeled his heart against its reception to the last. Let it be remembered by all those who may be disposed to admire the vain reasonings of this unhappy man, that he was the apologist, if not the advocate for one of the grossest crimes that can be committed against society. Such is almost universally the history of unbelief: "professing themselves to be wise, they become fools : " “not liking to retain God in their knowledge, he gives them over to a reprobate mind :” they abhor the purity of the gospel, and therefore pour forth all the venom of their malignity against it.

The doctrine of chances (says Dr. Keith) or calculation of pro-, babilities, has been reduced into a science, and is now in various ways of great practical use, and securely acted upon in the affairs of life. But it is altogether impossible that short sighted man could select, from the infinite multitude of the possible contingencies of distant ages, any one of such particular facts as abound in the prophecies; and it is manifest that, upon the principle of

No. 10. Vol. I.

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