Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 2, 2004 - Philosophy
This book traces the development of conceptions of God and the relationship between God's being and activity from Aristotle, through the pagan Neoplatonists, to thinkers such as Augustine, Boethius and Aquinas (in the West) and Dionysius the Areopagite, Maximus the Confessor and Gregory Palamas (in the East). The result is a comparative history of philosophical thought in the two halves of Christendom, providing a philosophical backdrop to the schism between the Eastern and Western Churches.
 

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Contents

The Prime Mover
17
Between Aristotle and Plotinus
38
Plotinus and the theory of two acts
66
The Platinum heritage in the West
90
Gods demons and theurgy
112
The formation of the eastern tradition
146
The flowering of the eastern tradition
180
Palamas and Aquinas
214
Epilogue
256
Bibliography
271
Index
285
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About the author (2004)

David Bradshaw is Associate Professor at the Department of Philosophy, University of Kentucky. He has published in a number of journals including Ancient Philosophy, Journal of the History of Philosophy, Review of Metaphysics and the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.

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