Women, Work and Leadership in Acts

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Mohr Siebeck, Aug 1, 2014 - Religion - 276 pages
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Teresa J. Calpino's social-historical examination opens out the significance of two women often bypassed in studies of Acts of the Apostles, Tabitha (Acts 9:36-43) and Lydia (Acts 16:11-15). In this first ever work to analyze these women as a pair, Calpino takes special notice of the ways in which depictions of the ideal woman in Greco-Roman literature are at variance with the descriptions of Tabitha and Lydia. She uncovers the signals to the Greco-Roman audience concerning each woman's portrait, as single, financially independent and socially respected as benefactresses, but each in her own unique manner. While recognizing certain differences in the societal parameters and cultural conventions that still held in the Greek East and Roman West, the author shows how each woman clearly belongs to the new movement across the Empire in which women take a more active part in business and commerce, as leaders and entrepreneurs.
 

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Contents

History of Interpretation
6
Conclusion
53
B Method for Chapters 2 and 3
60
The Guardianship and Legal Rights of Women
75
E Womens Right of Inheritance
82
F Women as Managers and Owners
88
G Women and Honorary Titles
96
The Roman Marriage
105
G Women and Inheritance
134
The Resuscitation of Tabitha
139
Conclusion
177
Womens Involvement in the Society of Philippi
183
E Conclusion
223
Bibliography
231
Index of Modern Authors
248
Subject Index
261

Dowry
115
F Women in Commerce
123

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