Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, Volume 23

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Vols. for 1869-1952 include Extracts from the proceedings of the Royal Horticultural Society.

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Page 401 - Philadelphia, be, and shall be, for ever hereafter, persons able and capable in law, to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended...
Page 400 - FIFTH, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, to all to whom these Presents shall come, GREETING ! Whereas...
Page 409 - ... matters and things in as ample manner and form as any other our liege subjects of this...
Page 373 - If the heat is too strong an ebullition is produced in the fruit, the skin bursts, the juice discharges, the prune becomes sticky, loses its flavor, and consequently its commercial value. After each cooking, which occupies about six hours, the fruit is removed from the oven and exposed to the air. When the prunes are cold they are carefully turned by women specially charged with this duty. They avoid disturbing the fruit while it is warm, as the touch renders it glutinous, and prevents the juice...
Page 417 - UOpfll rt.ltlStiral 5>OWtp," and for the purposes aforesaid, and by the name aforesaid, shall have perpetual succession and a common seal, with full power and authority to alter, vary, break, and renew the same at their discretion, and by the same name to sue and be sued...
Page 414 - Council hereby directed to be appointed and the Council of the said Society for the time being, or any three or more of them, all the members thereof having been first duly summoned to attend the meetings thereof, shall and may have power...
Page 373 - Prunes are divided into ten categories, taking the number of prunes necessary to a pound as a basis, and were formerly classified as follows: (1) Trash or refuse, more than 125 to the pound; (2) small prunes, 120 to 125 to the pound; (3) small ordinary, 110 to 115 to the pound; (4) fine ordinary, 100 to 105 to the pound; (5) superior ordinary, second, 90 to 95 to the pound; (6) superior ordinary, for exportation, or half choice in France, 80 to 85 to the pound; (7) first choice, 70 to 75 to the pound;...
Page 400 - ... purchase, receive, and possess, any goods and chattels whatsoever, and (notwithstanding the statutes of mortmain) to purchase, hold, and enjoy, to them and their successors, any lands, tenements, and hereditaments, whatsoever, not exceeding, at the time or times of purchasing...
Page 423 - The Annual Subscriptions shall be payable in advance on the 1st day of January in each year. 40.- — Each Member of the Institute shall be furnished annually by the Secretary with a copy of the Transactions and the Eules, and a list of the names and addresses of the Members.
Page 371 - United States Consul at Bordeaux, gives the following account of the French method of preparing the prune for market: " When the prune is ripe it is covered with a sort of glaucous powder, called flower, which greatly adds to its value as a table fruit. As the gathering is an important factor in the. subsequent value of the prune, great care and good management are indispensable. The fruit is usually gathered after the heat of the day has dissipated the humidity of the night. When possible, straw...

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