Reservation Reelism: Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film

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U of Nebraska Press, Jan 1, 2011 - Social Science - 376 pages
In this deeply engaging account Michelle H. Raheja offers the first book-length study of the Indigenous actors, directors, and spectators who helped shape Hollywoodês representation of Indigenous peoples. Since the era of silent films, Hollywood movies and visual culture generally have provided the primary representational field on which Indigenous images have been displayed to non-Native audiences. These films have been highly influential in shaping perceptions of Indigenous peoples as, for example, a dying race or as inherently unable or unwilling to adapt to change. However, films with Indigenous plots and subplots also signify at least some degree of Native presence in a culture that largely defines Native peoples as absent or separate. ¾ Native actors, directors, and spectators have had a part in creating these cinematic representations and have thus complicated the dominant, and usually negative, messages about Native peoples that¾films portray. In Reservation Reelism Raheja examines the history of these Native actors, directors, and spectators,¾reveals their contributions, and attempts to create positive representations in film that reflect the complex and vibrant experiences of Native peoples and communities.
 

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Contents

List of Illustrations
Redfacing Gender and Moving Images
Economies of Redfacing and the Ghostly Indian
Visual Sovereignty Indigenous Revisions of Ethnography and Atanarjuat The Fast
Epilogue
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Michelle H. Raheja is an assistant professor of English at the University of California, Riverside. Her articles have appeared in¾American Indian Culture and Research Journal, American Quarterly, and edited volumes.

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