Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage

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Takashi Sasayama, J. R. Mulryne, Margaret Shewring, Ronnie Mulryne
Cambridge University Press, 1998 - Drama - 357 pages
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In this book, originally published in 1999, leading Shakespeare scholars from Japan and the West broke new ground by studying the interaction of Japanese and Western conceptions of Shakespeare, and the assimilation of Shakespeare into richly traditional theatre practice. The first part deals with key twentieth-century moments in the production of Shakespeare, including the work of world-famous Japanese directors such as Ninagawa, Suzuki and Noda, while the second part considers parallels and differences between Japanese and western theatre over a longer timespan, focusing on the relationship of Shakespeare to traditional Japanese Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku and Kyogen. Additional features include full-colour illustrations, a comprehensive chronology of Shakespeare performances in Japan and the English text of a celebrated Kyogen adaptation of The Merry Wives of Windsor.
 

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Contents

Section 1
15
Section 2
19
Section 3
23
Section 4
27
Section 5
31
Section 6
38
Section 7
53
Section 8
61
Section 15
110
Section 16
124
Section 17
141
Section 18
145
Section 19
159
Section 20
176
Section 21
186
Section 22
194

Section 9
63
Section 10
65
Section 11
71
Section 12
86
Section 13
94
Section 14
109
Section 23
197
Section 24
214
Section 25
226
Section 26
243
Section 27
257

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