Hesperides: The Poems and Other Remains of Robert Herrick Now First Collected, Volume 1

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Page 43 - Then be not coy, but use your time; And while ye may, goe marry : For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry. SAFETY TO LOOK TO ONE'S SELFE. FOR my neighbour He not know, Whether high he builds or no : Onely this He look upon, Firm be my foundation. Sound, or unsound, let it be;
Page 109 - brought yee forth Meerly to shew your worth, And lose you quite. But you are lovely leaves, where we May read how soon things have Their end, though ne'r so brave : And after they have shown their pride. Like you a while : they glide Into the grave. MAN'S DYING-PLACE UNCERTAIN. MAN knowes where first he ships
Page xiii - Bat this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood. These traditionary tales of two centuries old, serve to show the respect in which a literary man is held even by the vulgar and uneducated." Herrick was succeeded in the Vicarage of Dean Prior by John
Page 43 - And this same flower that smiles to day, To morrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a getting; The sooner will his race be run, And neerer he's to setting. That age is best, which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; Then be not coy, but use your time; And while ye may,
Page 108 - FAIRE pledges of a fruitfull tree, Why do yee fall so fast? Your date is not so past; But you may stay yet here a while, To blush and gently smile ; And go at last. What, were yee borne to be
Page 65 - Bid that heart stay, and it will stay, To honour thy decree : Or bid it languish quite away, And't shall doe so for thee. While I have eyes to see: And having none, yet. I will keep Bid me to weep, and I will weep, A heart to weep for thee. Bid me
Page 65 - While I have eyes to see: And having none, yet. I will keep Bid me to weep, and I will weep, A heart to weep for thee. Bid me despaire, and He despaire, Under that cypresse tree : Or bid me die, and I will dare E'en Death, to die for thee.
Page 41 - but credit few or none. CORINNA'S GOING A MAYING. GET up, get up for shame, the blooming morne Upon her wings presents the god unshorne. See how Aurora throwes her faire Fresh-quilted colours through the aire: Get up, sweet-slug-a-bed, and see The dew-bespangling herbe and tree. Each flower has wept, and bow'd toward the east, Above an houre since;
Page 65 - despaire, Under that cypresse tree : Or bid me die, and I will dare E'en Death, to die for thee. The very eyes of me : And hast command of every part, Thou art my life, my love, my heart, To live and die for thee.
Page 134 - life, but sweet content. When now the cock (the plow-mans home) Calls forth the lilly-wristed morne; Then to thy corn-fields thou dost goe, Which though well soyl'd, yet thou dost know, That the best compost for the lands Is the wise masters feet, and hands. There at the plough thou find'st thy

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