Strain of Violence: Historical Studies of American Violence and Vigilantism

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Oxford University Press, Jan 2, 1975 - History - 408 pages
These essays, written by leading historian of violence and Presidential Commission consultant Richard Maxwell Brown, consider the challenges posed to American society by the criminal, turbulent, and depressed elements of American life and the violent response of the established order. Covering violent incidents from colonial American to the present, Brown presents illuminating discussions of violence and the American Revolution, black-white conflict from slave revolts to the black ghetto riots of the 1960s, the vigilante tradition, and two of America's most violent regions--Central Texas, whic.
 

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These books are being written by thieves, County Court house's are losing valuable family records because someone wants to make a buck off our ancestors. Comanche County, Texas has three sets of records missing on the Mackey family that is mentioned in this book.

Contents

Patterns of American Violence
3
EARLY AMERICAN ORIGINS OF VIOLENCE
37
The American Vigilante Tradition
95
The San Francisco
134
Legal and Behavioral
144
Blacks and Whites
185
Land
236
A Selective Listing of American Colonial Riots
301
Slave
320
notes
327
index
387
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Page 3 - I hope I am over wary ; but if I am not, there is even now something of ill omen amongst us. I mean the increasing disregard for law which pervades the country — the growing disposition to substitute the wild and furious passions in lieu of the sober judgment of conrts, and the worse than savage mobs for the executive ministers of justice.
Page 3 - Accounts of outrages committed by mobs form the every-day news of the times. They have pervaded the country from New England to Louisiana; they are neither peculiar to the eternal snows of the former nor the burning suns of the latter ; they are not the creature of climate, neither are they confined to the slave-holding or the non-slave-holding states. Alike they spring up among the pleasure-hunting masters of Southern slaves, and the order-loving citizens of the land of steady habits.

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