In the Line of Duty: Reflections of a Texas Ranger Private

Front Cover
University of North Texas Press, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 184 pages
Growing up in Central Texas in the early part of this century as a young man from a poor farming family, Lewis Rigler decided that there must be something else out there. That "something else” turned out to be an appointment to the Texas Rangers. In a career spanning three decades, Ranger Rigler witnessed an era of great political and social turbulence and change in the state as well as within the Ranger force he had sworn to serve. His service involved investigations into kidnappings, murders, strike violence, burglary rings--all manner of cases. Some he solved; others remained elusive. Along the way, he saved a life or two; others, he could not.
 

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Contents

White Robes and Torches
5
Horseback to Helicopters
11
Gettin By
21
The Clover Seed Siege
38
Two Little Girls
49
The Rough Edges
60
Rangers vs Prostitutes
73
Lostand Never Found
85
Professional vs Professional
116
In the Line of Duty
131
Hamburgers and Beer
140
A Different Slant
146
Three Rangers
153
Seven Months To Go
172
Afterword
177
Copyright

Those Chosen Americans
104

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Page viii - Ranger could ride like a Mexican, trail like an Indian, shoot like a Tennessean, and fight like a devil.
Page xviii - ... when to get up, when to go to bed, when to eat, when to shit even.

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About the author (1995)

Born in Lorena, Texas, in 1914, Lewis C. Rigler attended Texas A&M University. He entered Ranger service as a member of Dallas-based Company B, and retired in 1977. He is an investment consultant and owner of a bail-bond business. He speaks throughout Texas about his Ranger career.



Judyth W. Rigler is book editor of the San Antonio Express-News and writes "Lone Star Library,” a column on Texas books carried in newspapers throughout the state. She is married to Erik T. Rigler, Lewis Rigler's youngest son, who retired in 1994 after twenty-three years as an FBI agent and now works as an investigator for the Texas Lottery Commission.

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