On Modern Carriage-ways: Being a Paper Read Before the Sheffield Literary and Philosophical Society, on Friday, Nov. 3rd, 1843

Front Cover
R. Leader, 1843 - 24 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 19 - Smack went the whip, round went the wheels, Were never folk so glad ; The stones did rattle underneath, As if Cheapside were mad.
Page 5 - That a foundation or bottoming of large stones is unnecessary and injurious on any kind of subsoil." " That the maximum strength or depth of metal requisite for any road, is only ten inches." " That the duration only, and not the condition of a road, depends upon the quality and nature of the material used." " That free stone will make as good a road as any other kind of stone." " That it is no matter whether the substratum be soft or hard.
Page 6 - Whenever the natural soil is clay, or retentive of water, the pavement acts as an under drain to carry off any water that may pass through the surface of the road. The component stones of the pavement, having broader bases to stand upon than those that are broken small, are not so liable to be pressed into the earth below, particularly where the soil is soft. The expense of setting...
Page 19 - The rows are bevilled alternately in opposite directions, and each mass is further secured along the Sides with iron cramps, so that the whole mass resists the pressure on each particular block, and the adjoining masses support each other, because the alternate bevills at the ends form a dove-tailed joint. " This Company has from the first used a concrete substratum, and so far as a smooth surface is desirable, has always attained its object. It commenced operations in December, 1839, by laying down...
Page 4 - Diminish carriage expense but one farthing," said he, " and you widen the circle of intercourse ; you form, as it were, a new creation, not only of stones and earth, and trees and plants, but of men also, and, what is more, of industry, happiness, and joy.
Page 3 - Around every market-place you may suppose a number of concentric circles to be drawn, within each of which certain articles become marketable, which were not so before, and thus become the sources of wealth and prosperity to many individuals. Diminish the expense of carriage but one farthing, and you widen the circles, you form as it were a new creation, not only of stones and earth, and trees and plants, but of men also, and what is more, of industry and happiness.
Page 7 - Telford road, made with six inches of broken stone of great hardness, laid on a foundation of large stones set as a pavement 46
Page 7 - Ibs. ; on a road made with six inches of broken stone of great hardness, laid on a foundation of large stones, set in the form of a pavement, the power required is 46 Ibs. ; on a road made with a thick coating of broken stone, laid on earth, the power required is 65 Ibs.
Page 17 - ... in some places is the common material for paving the streets. In England, it was first introduced in the latter part of the year 1838, when a patent was obtained by Mr Stephen Geary, of Hamerton place, King's cross, London, for hexagon blocks, from four and a half to nine inches...

Bibliographic information