The Simulacra

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1964 - Fiction - 214 pages
4 Reviews
Set in the middle of the twenty-first century, The Simulacra is the story of an America where the whole government is a fraud and the President is an android. Against this backdrop Dr. Superb, the sole remaining psychotherapist, is struggling to practice in a world full of the maladjusted. Ian Duncan is desperately in love with the first lady, Nicole Thibideaux, who he has never met. Richard Kongrosian refuses to see anyone because he is convinced his body odor is lethal. And the fascistic Bertold Goltz is trying to overthrow the government. With wonderful aplomb, Philip K. Dick brings this story to a crashing conclusion and in classic fashion shows there is always another layer of conspiracy beneath the one we see.

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User Review  - ImperfectCJ - LibraryThing

I'm really digging Philip K Dick lately. The Simulacra has a lot of different layers and seems to be a commentary about the illusory underpinnings of the culture in which we live. Seems to suggest ... Read full review

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User Review  - Luisali - LibraryThing

As in many Dick's novels, there are lots of ideas introduced but most of them fizzled away. In The Simulacra there is material for another book at least. Dick stated that this book was derived from ... Read full review

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About the author (1964)

Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his life in California. He briefly attended the University of California, but dropped out before completing any classes. In 1952, he began writing professionally and proceeded to write numerous novels and short-story collections. He won the Hugo Award for the best novel in 1962 for The Man in the High Castle and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel of the year in 1974 for Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. Philip K. Dick died on March 2, 1982, in Santa Ana, California, of heart failure following a stroke.

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