Annual Report of the Common, Superior, Academic, and Normal and Model Schools in Nova Scotia for the School Year ...

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A. Grant, Printer to the Queen, 1879 - Education

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Page xviii - Several objections to the teaching of trades in the public school may thus be stated : (1) It is impossible for the public school to teach a tithe of its pupils the pursuit or occupation by which they are to earn a living. A glance at the list of occupations given in the report of the census of 1870 will satisfy any one that but very few of the three hundred and thirty-eight occupations therein named can be made a part of the public school course. Of the one hundred and seventy-two occupations classed...
Page 29 - ... the chairman presiding at such meeting shall require the person so offering, to make the following declaration : " I do declare and affirm that I am, and have been, for the thirty days last past, an actual resident of this school district and that I am qualified to vote at this meeting.
Page xix - ... to all youth would exhaust the present resources of the public schools. 2. The teaching of a few trades to all pupils would crowd these pursuits with workmen and reduce the compensation of skilled labor therein to the wages of common laborers.. The turning of the pupils in the public schools of our cities and towns into a few channels of industry, would glut these occupations and leave many skilled workmen without employment. The training of all the boys to be carpenters and blacksmiths, for...
Page xviii - Of the one hundred and seventy-two occupations classed as "manufactures and mechanical and mining industries "not a score can be taught in a school shop, and but few of these can thus be taught with any efficiency. The public school would make a large contract if it should undertake to train its pupils to be bakers, bleachers, dyers, bookbinders , brewers, brick and tile makers, butchers...
Page 58 - Educate all the men of a generation, and leave the woman uneducated, and every child under their influence begins his public education with all the disadvantages of his father. Educate all the females, and you will give a permanent impulse to the onward movement of the race, which it can never lose. Each individual begins his progress from a higher level, and, with equal exertion, will bequeath a richer inheritance of knowledge and wisdom to his successors.
Page 79 - To read a short paragraph from a book not confined to words of one syllable.
Page xx - Whenever ten or more duly licensed teachers within an inspectorial division shall in writing request the inspector to this effect, a teachers' institute for such district shall be formed,, the exclusive object of which shall be to promote the efficiency of the teaching service within the limits of the inspectorate. The means to be employed for securing this object shall be conversation and discussion of educational methods, the preparation and reading of papers on special subjects, and illustrative...
Page xxi - III. The President shall be the chief executive officer of the Association. He shall preside at the meetings of the Association and of the Executive Committee. In the absence of the President any duties devolving upon him may be performed by one of the Vice-Presidents. Treasurer IV. The duties of the Treasurer shall be to receive, safely keep and account for all moneys of the Association ; to keep correct accounts...
Page xix - ... into a few channels of industry, would glut these occupations and leave many skilled workmen without employment. The training of all the boys to be carpenters and blacksmiths, for example, would be worse than industrial folly. Not a tithe of them could earn a living as hand-tool mechanics. Handicraft is fast disappearing and more and more mechanical work is done by machinery. The coming artisan will be the master of the machine, as has been clearly shown by Professor THOMPSON, of the Technical...
Page 58 - an impulse has been given to society by the education of women ; yet no truly womanly duty has been neglected, nor are women less disposed to accept the cares of domestic life, or yield to the claims of conjugal or maternal affection.

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