The Gentleman's Magazine

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F. Jefferies, 1905 - Early English newspapers
The "Gentleman's magazine" section is a digest of selections from the weekly press; the "(Trader's) monthly intelligencer" section consists of news (foreign and domestic), vital statistics, a register of the month's new publications, and a calendar of forthcoming trade fairs.
 

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Page 261 - While round the armed bands Did clap their bloody hands ; He nothing common did, or mean, Upon that memorable scene, But with his keener eye The axe's edge did try ; Nor called the gods with vulgar spite To vindicate his helpless right, But bowed his comely head Down, as upon a bed.
Page 196 - A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian. Legg'd like a man! and his fins like arms! Warm, o
Page 491 - I dined (said he) very well for eight-pence, with very good company, at the PineApple in New-street, just by. Several of them had travelled. They expected to meet every day ; but did not know one another's names. It used to cost the rest a shilling, for they drank wine ; but I had a cut of meat for six-pence, and bread for a penny, and gave the waiter a penny; so that I was quite well served, nay, better than the rest, for they gave the waiter nothing.
Page 136 - And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he spake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Page 159 - Acquaint thyself with God, if thou wouldst taste His works. Admitted once to his embrace, Thou shall perceive that thou wast blind before : Thine eye shall be instructed ; and thine heart, Made pure, shall relish with divine delight, Till then unfelt, what hands divine have wrought.
Page 53 - said the grandmother ; " have you not heard, My poor, bad boy ! of the fiery pit, And how, drop by drop, this merciful bird Carries the water that quenches it ? " He brings cool dew in his little bill, And lets it fall on the souls of sin : You can see the mark on his red breast still Of fires that scorch as he drops it in.
Page 643 - A History of Our Own Times, from the Accession of Queen Victoria to the General Election of 1880.
Page 503 - I have consulted the star of his nativity by my own rules, and find he will infallibly die upon the 29th of March next, about eleven at night, of a raging fever: therefore I advise him to consider of it, and settle his affairs in time.
Page 266 - Tell them the men that placed him here Are scandals to the times — Are at a loss to find his guilt, And can't commit his crimes.
Page 76 - em, they are the most shallow, pitiful, barren fellows, that live upon the: face of the earth again. Mat. Indeed here are a number of fine speeches in this book. O eyes, no eyes, but fountains fraught with tears! there's a conceit! fountains fraught with tears! O life, no life, but lively form of death!

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