Humanitarian Law Violations in Kosovo

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Human Rights Watch, 1998 - Atrocities - 130 pages
2 Reviews
Based on research conducted in Kosovo, Montenegro, and Albania between May and Sept. 1998.
 

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Completely biased and limited observation with the time period of only couple months. Kosovo as part of Serbia for decades receved financial funding to improve the quality of life in this southern province. Unfortunately this did not help in any way to reduce intolerance on Albanian population living in the province, towards Serbian goverment. Acording to Western standards they had the one of the best treatments you can find in Eastern Europe. From free educatrion on Albanian language, not just in elementary but instead through the whole eduaction including secondary, university and masters programs. Reducing the scope to period of only four months, when conflict wass on the highes point shows biased observation serving only one purpose - justification for Kosovo independance. 

Contents

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 96 - ... (a) violence to life and person, in particular murder of all kinds, mutilation, cruel treatment and torture; (b) taking of hostages: (c) outrages upon personal dignity, in particular, humiliating and degrading treatment; (d) the passing of sentences and the carrying out of executions without previous judgment pronounced by a regularly constituted court affording all the judicial guarantees which are recognized as indispensable by civilized peoples.
Page 95 - Persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed hors de combat by sickness, wounds, detention, or any other cause...
Page 101 - ... an attack which may be expected to cause incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects, or a combination thereof, which would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated.
Page 91 - I) and which take place in the territory of a High Contracting Party between its armed forces and dissident armed forces or other organized armed groups which, under responsible command, exercise such control over a part of its territory as to enable them to carry out sustained and concerted military operations and to implement this Protocol.
Page 95 - In the case of armed conflict not of an international character occurring in the territory of one of the High Contracting Parties, each Party to the conflict shall be bound to apply, as a minimum, the following provisions: (1) Persons taking no active part in the hostilities, including members of armed forces who have laid down their arms and those placed hors de combat...
Page 98 - Persons who accompany the armed forces without actually being members thereof, such as civilian members of military aircraft crews, war correspondents, supply contractors, members of labour units or of services responsible for the welfare of the armed forces...
Page 90 - Convention shall apply to all cases of declared war or of any other armed conflict which may arise between two or more of the High Contracting Parties, even if the state of war is not recognized by one of them.
Page 102 - Indiscriminate attacks are: (a) those which are not directed at a specific military objective; (b) those which employ a method or means of combat which cannot be directed at a specific military objective; or ( < • ) those which employ a method or means of combat the effects of which cannot be limited as required by this Protocol; and consequently, in each such case, are of a nature to strike military objectives and civilians or civilian objects without distinction.
Page 103 - Ordering the displacement of the civilian population for reasons related to the conflict, unless the security of the civilians involved or imperative military reasons so demand; ix.
Page 92 - That distinction must be made at all times between persons taking part in the hostilities and members of the civilian population to the effect that the latter be spared as much as possible; 2.

About the author (1998)

Fred Abrahams is a senior researcher and Carroll Bogert is Communications Director for Human Rights Watch. Eric Stover is Director of the Human Rights Center and Adjunct Professor in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. Gilles Peress is a photographer for the "New Yorker" and a senior research associate at the Human Rights Center.

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