Sexual Abuse of Young Children in Southern Africa

Front Cover
Linda M. Richter, Linda Richter, Andrew Dawes, Craig Higson-Smith
HSRC Press, 2004 - Social Science - 478 pages
With contributions from leading legal and policy researchers, clinical practitioners and child development specialists in southern Africa, this volume is an invitation to reflect on the many-sided nature of sexual abuse of young children. Many of the contributors propose effective ways to prevent abuse or improve care and services for the many affected children and their families. The book is in five parts. The opening section confronts the realities of sexual abuse of pre-pubertal children and the way abuse is represented in the press. The second section discusses the individual and socio-cultural causes of child sexual abuse. Section three covers legal and policy responses to the problem, while the fourth section presents a series of accounts of interventions on behalf of abused children drawn from South Africa, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. The book concludes with some critical reflections on research in this area.
 

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Page 165 - January 1951 and owing to a wellfounded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country...
Page 298 - States parties shall take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect the child from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has the care of the child.
Page 17 - The history of childhood is a nightmare from which we have only recently begun to awaken. The further back in history one goes, the lower the level of child care, and the more likely children are to be killed, abandoned, beaten, terrorized, and sexually abused.
Page 162 - Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs...
Page 162 - Crime, defines trafficking in persons as: "... the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use offeree or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person for the purpose of exploitation.
Page 212 - In the performance of their duties, prosecutors shall: (a) Carry out their functions impartially and avoid all political, social, religious, racial, cultural, sexual or any other kind of discrimination; (b) Protect the public interest, act with objectivity, take proper account of the position of the suspect and the victim, and pay attention to all relevant circumstances, irrespective of whether they are to the advantage or disadvantage of the suspect...
Page 55 - Child sexual abuse is a sexual act imposed on a child who lacks emotional, maturational, and cognitive development.
Page 204 - Such protective measures should, as appropriate, include effective procedures for the establishment of social programmes to provide necessary support for the child and for those who have the care of the child, as well as for other forms of prevention...
Page 85 - Caputo, AA, Frick, PJ, & Brodsky SL (1999). Family violence and juvenile sex offending: The potential mediating role of psychopathic traits and negative attitudes toward women. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 26, 338356.
Page 162 - Trafficking in persons" shall mean the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.

About the author (2004)

\Linda Richter is an executive director of the Child, Youth, and Family Development research program at the Human Sciences Research Council. Andrew Dawes is a director in the Child, Youth, and Family Development research program at the Human Sciences Research Council. Craig Higson-Smith is a director of the South African Institute for Traumatic Stress.

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