Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 10 of 48 on Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine....
" Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. "
Cherry Blossom Epiphany: The Poetry and Philosophy of a Flowering Tree - Page 455
by Robin D. Gill - 2006 - 740 pages
Full view - About this book

Scribner's Magazine, Volume 72

Edward Livermore Burlingame, Robert Bridges, Alfred Dashiell, Harlan Logan - American periodicals - 1922
...longing. Among the many false dicta of smartly epigrammatic Oscar Wilde is one which declares that "All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be natural is to be obvious and to Бе obvious is to be inartistic." Its untruth is proved (if, indeed, proof of its falsity be needed)...
Full view - About this book

Degeneration

Max Simon Nordau - Comparative literature - 1895 - 560 pages
...Like his French masters, Oscar Wilde despises Nature. ' Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be...obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic.'* He is a ' cultivator of the Ego,' and feels deliciously indignant at the fact that Nature dares to...
Full view - About this book

Intentions

Oscar Wilde - Art critics - 1904 - 236 pages
...purely, as an artist should. A real passion would ruin him. Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be...be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. Ernest. I wonder do you really believe what you say. Gilbert. Why should you wonder ? It is not merely...
Full view - About this book

Complete Works, Volume 7

Oscar Wilde - 1909
...purely, as an artist should. A real passion would ruin him. Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be...be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. ERNEST. I wonder do you really believe what you say ? GILBERT. Why should you wonder? It is not merely...
Full view - About this book

Sebastian Melmoth [and] The Soul of Man

Oscar Wilde - 1905 - 222 pages
...even a momentary separation from anyone to whom one has just been introduced is almost unbearable. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. 35 One is tempted to define man as a rational animal who always loses his /, temper when he is called...
Full view - About this book

Decorative Art in America

Oscar Wilde - Art - 1906 - 294 pages
...have nailed their own ears to the keyhole. That is much worse. — The Soul of Man Under Socialism. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be...be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. — The Critic as Artist. Part II. THE SHAMROCK The spreading rose is fair to view, And rich the modest...
Full view - About this book

The writings of Oscar Wilde ...

Oscar Wilde, Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly, Lady Wilde - 1907
...her. THE Cnmc AS AKTIST. To know the vintage and quality of a wine, one need not drink the whole cask. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. What is truth? In matters of religion, it is simply the opinion that has survived. In matters of science,...
Full view - About this book

Intentions: The decay of lying; Pen, pencil, and poison; The critic as artist

Oscar Wilde - 1909
...purely, as an artist should. A real passion would ruin him. Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be...be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. Ernest. I wonder do you really believe what you Bay. Gilbert . Why should you wonder? It is not merely...
Full view - About this book

The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde: Together with Essays and ..., Volume 9

Oscar Wilde - 1910
...purely, as an artist should. A real passion would ruin him. Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. . To...be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. Ernest. I wonder do you really believe what you say. Gilbert. Why should you wonder? It is not merely...
Full view - About this book

The Prose of Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde - Prose literature - 1916 - 806 pages
...purely, as an artist should. A real passion would ruin him. Whatever actually occurs is spoiled for art. All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be...be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic. ERNEST. I wonder do you really believe what you say? GILBERT. Why should you wonder? It is not merely...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search