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of some part of the system; and the accumulation of the sensorial power of irritation in that part renews the action of it, when it has increased its irritability so much as to overbalance the defect of stimulus in one case, and the exhaustion of sensorial power in the other; which latter requires a much longer torpor or cold fit than the former. But in the cold paroxysm of fever, besides the torpor of one part of the system from defect of irritation, the remainder of it becomes torpidowing to defect of excitement of the sensorial power of association by the lessened action of the part first affected. This torpor of the general system remains, till the accumulation of the sensorial power of association has increased the associability so much as to overbalance the defect of the excitement of association; then the torpor ceases, and if the first affected part has recovered its aćtivity, the other parts are all thrown into excess of a&tion by their increased associability, and the hot fit of fever is produced.

9. In the continued fevers with strong pulse the stomach is affected secondarily, and thus acts feebly from deficient excitement of the power of association; but the accumulation of the power of association thus produced in an organ subječt to perpetual and energetic action, is so great as to affect the next link of the associate train, which consists of the heart and arteries; these therefore are exerted perpetually with increase of a&tion. In

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In continued fevers with weak pulse the torpid stomach is affected primarily by previous exhaustion of its irritability by stimulus, as of contagious matter swallowed into it. The heart and arteries aétfeebly from deficient excitement of the power of association, owing to the torpor of the stomach, with which they are catenated; but the accumulation of the power of association, thus produced in organs subject to perpetual and energetic motion, is so great, as to affect the next link of the associate train; which consists of the capillaries of the skin or other glands; these therefore are exerted perpetually with great increase of action.

The continued severs with strong pulse terminate by the redućtion or exhaustion of the senso

rial power by violent action of the whole system;

which is followed either by return of health with the natural quantity of irritability, and of associand consequent death. In continued fevers with weak pulse the flomach remains torpid during the whole course of the fever; and at length by the recovery of its irritability and sensibility effects the cure of it. Which generally happens about the first, second, pr third quarter of the lunar period, counted from the commencement of the disease, or continues a whole lunation, and sometimes more; which gave rise to what are termed critical days. See Seół, XXXVI. 4. on this subject. If the stomach mach does not recover from its torpor, the patient becomes emaciated, and dies exhausted by the continuance of the increased action of the capillaries and absorbents, and the want of nourishment.

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The cure of continued fever with weak pulse consists first in weakening the undue action of the capillaries of the skin by ablution with cold water from 32 to 80 degrees of heat; or by exposing them to cool air. Secondly, by invigorating the actions of the stomach, by decreasing them for a time, and thence accumulating the power of irritation, as by an emetic, or by iced water, or iced wine. Or by increase of stimulus, as by bark, wine, opium, and food, in small quantities frequently repeated. Or by renewing the action of the stomach by slight electric shocks. Or by fomenting it frequently with water heated to 96 or loodegrees. Or lastly by exciting its power of association with other parts of the system, as by a blister; which succeeds best when the extremities are cool; or by swinging, as in vertigo rotatoria.

If by the stimulus of the Peruvian bark on the fibres of the stomach, they regain their due action, the heart and arteries also regain their due action; as their sensorial power of association is now excited, and expended as usual. And as there is then no accumulation of sensorial power in the heart and arteries, the capillaries cease to

ačt with too great energy, and the fever is cured. Thirdly. Thirdly. If the heart and arteries could be themselves stimulated into greater action, although the stomach remained torpid, they might probably by expending a greater quantity of the sensorial power of irritation, prevent an accumulation of the sensorial power of association, (for these may possibly be only different modes of aćtion of the spirit of animation,) and thus the too great action of the capillaries might be prevented and the fever cease. This new mode of cure might possibly be accomplished, if the patient was to breathe a gallon or two of pure or diluted oxygene gas frequently in a day; which by passing through the moist membranes of the lungs and uniting with the blood might render it more stimulant, and thus excite the heart and arteries into greater action. Fourthly. Greater energy might probably be given to the whole system, and particularly to those parts which act too feebly in fevers, as the stomach and the heart and arteries, if the action of the secerning vessels of the brain could be increased in energy; this is probably one effect of all those drugs, which when given in large quantity induce intoxication, as wine and opium. And when given with great caution in small quantities uniformly repeated, as from three drops to five of the tinéture of opium, but not more, every fix hours, I believe they supply an efficacious mcdicine in fewers with great arterial debility; and the

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