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LONDON, SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1855.

George is but a poor bibliographer) actually seen by him, he specifies :

“ The · Assertio Septem Sacramentorum,' written by OUR TWELFTH VOLUME.

Henry VIII., a royal literary effort in defence of the seven

Roman Catholic Sacraments, that procured the title of IN commencing our TWELFTH VOLUME We cannot

Defender of the Faith for the author ;' resist giving utterance to a few words of courteous acknowledgment to all those Friends, Contributors, and And he then proceeds to describe it as Readers to whose kind assistance We are indebted for

“ A good thick octavo volume, written in Latin, and our success. We thank them all most heartily. And printed in the year 1501 (a mistake for 1521) in London, while We venture with confidence to direct their at- on vellum. The type is clear, with a broad margin, and tention to our present Number, as a proof that custom

at the beginning is the original presentation address to

Leo X. as follows, subscribed by the royal autograph: does not stale the infinite variety of our pages, We promise them increased exertions to make “ NOTES AND « : Anglorum Rex Henricus, Leo Decime, mittit QUERIES " deserving of a continuance of that favour which Hoc opus, et fidei testis * et amicitiæ."" has hitherto been so lavishly bestowed upon it. — Vale. Strype, in his Memorials, vol. i. p.51. (ed. 1822),

states that the presentation of the book to the

Pope was brought about by the means of Cardinal Notes.

Wolsey, " who procured some copies to be written

in a very fine and beautiful character, and one of COPY OF THE ASSERTIO SEPTEM SACRAMENTORUM

them to be bound up splendidly, namely, that that ADVERSOS LUTHERUM," PRESENTED BY HENRY

was to be sent especially to the Pope, and the said VIII. TO THE POPE IN 1521.

cardinal sent that especially to the King, for his Evelyn, in his Diary, vol. i. p. 128. (edit. 1819), liking of it, before it went.” It would be desirable speaking of his visit to the Vatican library at to know the authority of Strype for these asserRome, Jan. 18, 1644-5, and the rarities he had tions. The book itself was printed by Pynson, seen there, after mentioning the two Virgils, the " apud inclytam urbem Londinum, in ædibus Terence, &c., adds, “what we English do much Pynsonianis, an. MDXXI, quarto idus Julii," and inquire after, the booke which our Hen. VIII, writ from the original correspondence of Dr. John against Luther." The late editor, Mr. Bray, sub- Clerk (the King's Orator at Rome) to Wolsey, prejoins the following note :

served in the Cottonian MS. Vitellius, B. iv., two “ This very book, by one of those curious chances that of the most important letters of which are printed occasionally happens, has recently been brought to Eng- by Sir H. Ellis in vol. i. pp. 257, 262. of his third land, where the editor has seen it; and, what is very re- series of Original Letters, it appears that no less markable, wherever the title of Defender of the Faith is subjoined to the name of Henry, the Pope has drawn his ones), each signed by the King's own hand, were

than twenty-eight copies (apparently printed pen through the epithet. The name of the king occurs in his own handwriting, both at the beginning and end;

forwarded to Rome, out of which number, at a and on the binding are the royal arms. The present pos- private interview with the Pope, in September, sessor [Mr. Woodburn] purchased it in Italy for a few 1521, Dr. Clerk delivered two copies to his Holishillings from an old book-stall."

ness, one of which was covered with cloth of gold, In this statement, Mr. Bray is unquestionably and at the end of this copy (not at the beginning, in error.

The volume he mentions was after- as stated by Sir G. Head) were two verses in the wards presented by Mr. Woodburn to the Fitz- King's autograph, "wryten with a very small william Museum, at Cambridge, where I saw it penne," and which, although stated by Clerk to be in 1846, and where it is exhibited to visitors as the of the King's own composition, were in reality sent identical copy sent by King Henry VIII. to the to Henry by Cardinal Wolsey, to be inserted in Pope, which was stolen from the Vatican library the Pope's copy. Five or six more copies, at the during the time the French were in Italy. It is Pope's request, were sent to him by Dr. Clerk, to in the original binding, and signed by the King at be delivered to sundry learned cardinals; and the beginning and end, but is printed on paper, after the public presentation of the book to the whereas the copy presented by Henry to the Pope Pope in full consistory, held on the 2nd Octowas printed on vellum ; and so far from having ber (the whole process of which is related by been "stolen from the Vatican,” no doubt exists Clerk), the remaining copies were forwarded, by there at this moment. At all events, it was safely direction of Cardinal Wolsey, " to various regions, preserved there subsequent to my visit to the Fitzwilliam Museum, as proved by Sir George

* Lalande, who saw this book in the Vatican in 1765, Head's account of the Vatican library in his work

reads (in his Voyage d'Italie, tom. iii. p. 259., 1769, entitled Rome, a Tour of many Days, 8vo., 1849; by the king's own hand; a fact meant probably also to

12mo.) testem, and says that these two verses were written in which, among "a few particular objects con- be expressed by the ambiguous words of Sir G. Head, sidered the staple curiosities of the region” (Sir quoted above.

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LADY ANNE CLIFFORD.

universities, and countries, as they were addressed This and two or three more volumes seem to and ordered.”

have been regularly continued, and all the earlier It seems therefore certain, that the copy on legal transactions of the family, marriages, settlepaper belonging formerly to Mr. Woodburn, and ments, &c., to have been collected and enrolled.” now in the Fitzwilliam Museum, was not the one In the York volume of the Transactions of the richly bound in cloth of gold presented to the Archæological Institute (1848), Mr. Hailstone has Pope, and laid up in the Vatican (where Lord printed " A true Memoriall of the Life of Lady Herbert of Cherbury afterwards saw it), but one Ann Clifford.” This account he states to be taken of those which were given to the cardinals; and from “ a small 4to. volume containing an abstract we may consequently conclude that the pen which or summary of the three great books of records struck out in it the title of Defender of the Faith kept at Skipton Castle,” and was probably made was guided by a less infallible band than that of by the Countess's secretary from “À Sūmarie and the Pope. In fact, Leo X. died at the end of No. Memoriall at the conclusion of the records in the vember, 1521, before the bull issued for the royal third volume.” He adds that “the MS. is in title bad reached England ; and consequently it is several persons' handwriting, but has not only quite impossible he could have struck out the been dictated, but corrected by the Countess, as words Defensor Fidei in the copy presented to many interlineations, and references to texts of him.

Scripture, are made in her handwriting." ValuIt may be added, that at Bologna is still pre- able as is this paper, from the facts and dates it served one of the copies sent to foreign universi- contains, it is rendered less interesting from being ties, stamped with the royal arms, and signed with abbreviated, and written in the third person. the King's hand ; also that two other copies Mr. Craik, in his Romance of the Peerage, says printed on vellum are mentioned by Van Praet, that “various diaries of portions of Lady Anne's one of which is in the Spenser library.

own life, as well as historical memoirs of her an

F. MADDEN. cestry, drawn up by her, or under her direction, British Museum.

are spoken of as still existing at Skipton or Ap-l pleby;" and he adds, very truly, that “it is remarkable in how indistinct a way these manuscripts have been spoken of by almost every

writer who has referred to them."* It is to this The acceptable re-publication of a portion of point that I would chiefly direct the attention of Daniel's Works, by Mr. Morris of Bath, bas

your readers. The very title of the Diary, as brought afresh to our minds the poet's distinguished given by different persons, varies. According to pupil, the Lady Anne Clifford. It is well known

Mr. Baynes (Biog. Brit., vol. iii. p. 640.) it stands that this lady, having passed her sixty-third year, thus : compiled a Diary or Memoir of her life, or what

“A Summary of the Records, and a true Memorial of she calls “ Memorables of Myself.”

the Life of the Lady Anne Clifford, who by birth being Nine years ago, and at a later period, we find sole daughter and heir to my illustrious father, George the following amongst the list of suggested pub- Clifford, the third Earl of Cumberland, by his virtuous lications of the Camden Society : “ The Auto

wife, Margaret Russell, my mother,” &c. &c. &c., referring

to her ancestry, titles, and marriages. biography of Anne Clifford, Countess of Pembroke, Dorset, and Montgomery, and other Re There is a MS. in the British Museum (Harl cords preserved in Skipton Castle. To be edited MS. 6177.), a folio of about 240 pages, a transcript by Edward Hailstone, Esq.” It will be a subject only; it is entitled, of much regret if Mr. Hailstone bas abandoned “ A Summary of the Lives of the Veteriponts, Cliffords, This work. More than twenty years since I and Earls of Cumberland, and of the Lady Anne, Countess strongly urged that

, if permission could be on Earl of Cumberland, in whom the name of the said tained,' the Diary of the Countess, and also that Clifforda determined. Copied from the original MS. the of her mother Margaret

, Countess of Cumberland, 29th of December, 1737, by Henry Fisher.” if existing, should engage the attention of an Mr. Hawkins informs me that it appears entire, editor, who would not only bring to his labours a witho it breaks, any marks of omissions or inknowledge of the eventful story of their lives, but sertions ; but where the original is lodged, or who would treat the narrative of their joys and from whence this copy was taken, we are no

where told. sorrows with genuine feeling.

In the very last month a valued friend of mine, “ Many things that have been quoted from the who adorns the judicial bench (when speaking of

* . p Daniel's Works, and of the great Countess"), to Mr. Craik's Interesting work, it is due to the author to observes, “Good service would be done if some

state that no writer has taken so much pains to ascertain

the authenticity of the transcripts and extracts given competent person were permitted to examine and print the interesting parts of ber autobiography, from the Countess's Diary as he has done.

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Countess's Memoirs or Diaries,” Mr. Craik says, “are not breathe and words that burn” should have burst to be found in this transcript. Fisher is, moreover, a very from the excellent judge ? ignorant and incompetent hand, and appears to have been frequently unable to read what he undertook to

Gilpin mentions that he has "derived the most copy: Mr. Baynes's transcript,” of which I shall presently material part of his History of the Countess from speak, “may, however, have been made from his.” * a MS. life of Mr. Sedgwick, her secretary, written

Extracts have been given by Seward from by himself. In this work Mr. Sedgwick occasionwhat he terms “ Memoirs of the early part of the ally inserts a few circumstances relating to his Countess’s Life, printed for the first time," † but lady. It is a pity he had not given her the better he gives no authority in confirmation of their share. His MS. is still extant in Appleby Castle.” authenticity, and they appear perfectly distinct The three folios Gilpin did not see, but, when from Mr. Hailstone's - Memoriall."

speaking of the Countess's own “Journal,” he Extracts, purporting to be taken from the adds, "What an interesting collection of valuable Countess's Diary, have also been given by Pennant, of such a life!" The original diary, he had been

anecdotes might be furnished from the incidents. Whitaker, and Hartley Coleridge. The last able writer says that he is mainly indebted to Dr. informed, “ the late Earl of Thanet destroyed, as it Whitaker for his facts. He also refers to “Sir contained many severe remarks on several chaMatthew Hale's MSS.” (portions, doubtless, of racters of those times which the earl supposed the three folios), and gives us quotations in the might give offence to their families."* * Countess's own language. These we also find port might possibly have been circulated in order given by Baynes, but they are not in Whitaker's

to prevent the MS. from being examined. Whitor Seward's Works ; nor in Mr. Hailstone's tran- aker tells us that amidst the evidences of Skipton script. When alluding to these MSS. we may

are several memoranda of large parcels of papers refer to Roger North, who accompanied his rela

sent away by order of Thomas, Earl of Thanet. tive the Chief Justice (afterwards Lord Keeper)

(P. 316. note.) on the Circuit, and visited Appleby Castle soon

The friend, to whom I have already referred, after the Countess's death. He speaks of her as

states, that he saw the folio volumes as late as the a magnificent and learned lady." “It was said,” year 1843; and also that “loose in one volume • he adds, “ that Hales (sic), afterwards Chief

was a birthday letter from the Countess to her Justice, assisted her in the perusal and methodizing father when aged, eight or nine, much like a of her evidences and muniments, and made her modern valentine.” In addition to the larger fair extracts of them."

Diaries, Whitaker mentions “an original book We cannot but mark the ungracious terms in of accounts, filled with memoranda relative to which Hale's labours are alluded to both by Lady Anne's education, from 1600 to 1602," - Whitaker and Coleridge. The former, who has from which he has given extracts. Was this comlargely availed himself of them, coolly observes pletely distinct from the other documents ? that

Pennant, who has devoted some pages to Skipton

Castle, and to the Cliffords, mentions the Countess “ Ingenuous curiosity, and perhaps too the necessary inMargaret's letters as extant in manuscript, and also vestigation of her claims to the baronies of the family, led her diary, and that of her daughter ; "the former the Countess to compile their history; an industrious and mentions," he says, “ several minutiæ that I omit, perhaps might have been expected from the assistance of being only proofs of her great attention to ac

Sir Matthew Hale, who, though a languid writer, was a curacy."† It is pretty clear that this last obE man of great acuteness and comprehension.” History of servation applies to the Lady Anne I, not to her Craven, p. 313.

mother. In terms not more complimentary Coleridge The following letter in my possession, addressed says:

to Ritson, is in manuscript, but though not pub· Lady Anne herself made a digest of the family re

lished in his correspondence (1833), it may have cords, with the assistance of Sir Matthew Hale. We re- appeared elsewhere in print. The writer, John gret to say that, from the specimen we have seen, the Baynes, Esq., of Embsay, near Bolton Abbey (to learned judge seems to have contrived to shed a sombre, wbom reference has already been made), was à more interested about the tenures, leases, and other legal Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. Having antiquities, than about the wild adventures, loves, and gained the highest honours in the university, and wars of the ancient house.” — Biographia Borealis, p. 243. Did these writers expect that, whilst engaged in

* Observations on the Mountains and Lakes of Cumbersuch a laborious and unimaginative occupation as

land and Westmoreland, vol. ii. pp. 161. 164.

Tour in Scotland, vol. ii. p. 358. digest of grants and charters, “thoughts that

66

a

| “With a Shandean exactness, very unusual among

female autobiographers in these days, Lady Anne begins * Romance of the Peerage, vol. iv. p. 141.

her memoirs of herself nine months before her nativity, † Anecdotes of some distinguished Persons, vol. iv. for the sake of introducing a beautiful quotation from

Psalm cxxxix. 12—16." - Biographia Borealis, p. 269.

p. 302.

LADY ANNE CLIFFORD.

universities, and countries, as they were addressed This and two or three more volumes seem to and ordered."

have been regularly continued, and all the earlier It seems therefore certain, that the copy on legal transactions of the family, marriages, settlepaper belonging formerly to Mr. Woodburn, and ments, &c., to have been collected and enrolled.” now in the Fitzwilliam Museum, was not the one In the York volume of the Transactions of the richly bound in cloth of gold presented to the Archeological Institute (1848), Mr. Hailstone has Pope, and laid up in the Vatican (where Lord printed A true Memoriall of the Life of Lady Herbert of Cherbury afterwards saw it), but one Ann Clifford.” This account he states to be taker of those which were given to the cardinals ; and from “a small 4to. volume containing an abstract we may consequently conclude that the pen which or summary of the three great books of records struck out in it the title of Defender of the Faith kept at Skipton Castle," and was probably made was guided by a less infallible hand than that of by the Countess's secretary from “À Sūmarie and the Pope. In fact, Leo X. died at the end of No- Memoriall at the conclusion of the records in the vember, 1521, before the bull issued for the royal third volume.” He adds that “the MS. is in title bad reached England; and consequently it is several persons' handwriting, but has not only quite impossible he could have struck out the been dictated, but corrected by the Countess, as words Defensor Fidei in the copy presented to many interlineations, and references to texts of bim.

Scripture, are made in her handwriting." ValuIt may be added, that at Bologna is still pre- able as is this paper, from the facts and dates it served one of the copies sent to foreign universi- contains, it is rendered less interesting from being ties, stamped with the royal arms, and signed with abbreviated, and written in the third person. the King's hand ; also that two other copies Mr. Craik, in his Romance of the Peerage, says printed on vellum are mentioned by Van Praet, that “various diaries of portions of Lady Anne's one of which is in the Spenser library.

own life, as well as historical memoirs of her an

F. MADDEN. cestry, drawn up by ber, or under her direction, British Museum.

are spoken of as still existing at Skipton or Appleby ;” and he adds, very truly, that "it is remarkable in how indistinct a way these manuscripts have been spoken of by almost every

writer who has referred to them."* It is to this The acceptable re-publication of a portion of point that I would chiefly direct the attention of Daniel's Works, by Mr. Morris of Bath, bas

your readers. The very title of the Diary, as brought afresh to our minds the poet's distinguished

given by different persons, varies. According to pupil, the Lady Anne Clifford. It is well known

Mr. Baynes (Biog. Brit., vol. iii. p. 640.) it stands that this lady, having passed her sixty-third year,

thus : compiled a Diary or Memoir of her life, or what

“A Summary of the Records, and a true Memorial of she calls “ Memorables of Myself.”

the Life of the Lady Anne Clifford, who by birth being Nine years ago, and at a later period, we find sole daughter and heir to my illustrious father, George the following amongst the list of suggested pub- Clifford, the third Earl of Cumberland, by his virtuous lications of the Camden Society : “ The Auto- wife, Margaret Russell, my mother,” &c. &c. &c., referring biography of Anne Clifford, Countess of Pem

to her ancestry, titles, and marriages. broke, Dorset, and Montgomery, and other Re- There is a MS. in the British Museum (Harl cords preserved in Skipton Castle

. To be edited MS. 6177.), a folio of about 240 pages, a transcript by Edward Hailstone, Esq.” It will be a subject only; it is entitled, of much regret if Mr. Hailstone bas abandoned

“A Summary of the Lives of the Veteriponts, Cliffords, this work. More than twenty years since I and Earls of Cumberland, and of the Lady Anne, Countess

Dowager of Pembroke, &c., daughter and heir to George, strongly urged that, if permission could be obs Earl of Cumberland, in whom the name of the said tained, the Diary of the Countess, and also that Clitoria determined. Copied from the original MS. the of her mother Margaret, Countess of Cumberland, 29th of December, 1737, by Henry Fisher." if existing, should engage the attention of an Mr. Hawkins informs me that it appears entire, editor, who would not only bring to hiş labours a without breaks, any marks of omissions or inknowledge of the eventful story of their lives, but sertions ; 'but where the original is lodged, or who would treat the narrative of their joys and from whence this copy yas taken, we are nosorrows with genuine feeling.

where told. In the very last month a valued friend of mine,

“ Many things that have been quoted from the who adorns the judicial bench (when speaking of

* Romance of the Peerage, vol. iv. p. 135. In referring Daniel's Works, and of the “ great Countess"),

to Mr. Craik's interesting work, it is due to the author to observes, “Good service would be done if some

state that no writer has taken so much pains to ascertain competent person were permitted to examine and

the authenticity of the transcripts and extracts given

from the Countess's Diary as he has done, print the interesting parts of ber autobiography.

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This re

Countess's Memoirs or Diaries,” Mr. Craik says, “ are not breathe and words that burn” should have burst to be found in this transcript. Fisher is, moreover, a very from the excellent judge ? ignorant and incompetent hand, and appears to have been frequently unable to read what he undertook to

Gilpin mentions that he has “ derived the most copy: Mr. Baynes's transcript,” of which I shall presently material part of his History of the Countess from speak, “may, however, have been made from his." * a MS. life of Mr. Sedgwick, her secretary, written

Extracts have been given by Seward from by himself. In this work Mr. Sedgwick occasionwhat he terms “ Memoirs of the early part of the ally inserts a few circumstances relating to his Countess's Life, printed for the first time,” † but lady. It is a pity

, he had not given her the better he gives no authority in confirmation of their share. His MS. is still extant in Appleby Castle.” authenticity, and they appear perfectly distinct The three folios Gilpin did not see, but, when from Mr. Hailstone's " Memoriall."

speaking of the Countess's own “ Journal," he Extracts, purporting to be taken from the adds, “What an interesting collection of valuable Countess's Diary, have also been given by Pennant, anecdotes might be furnished from the incidents Whitaker, and Hartley Coleridge. The last able of such a life!”. The original diary, he had been

writer says that he is mainly indebted to Dr. informed, “ the late Earl of Thanet destroyed, as it * Whitaker for his facts. He also refers to “Sir contained many severe remarks on several chaMatthew Hale's MSS." (portions, doubtless

, of racters of those times which the earl supposed the three folios), and gives us quotations in the might give offence to their families.” *

Countess's own language. These we also find port might possibly have been circulated in order given by Baynes, but they are not in Whitaker's

to prevent the MS. from being examined. Whitor Seward's Works; nor in Mr. Hailstone's tran

aker tells us that amidst the evidences of Skipton script. When alluding to these MSS. we may

are several memoranda of large parcels of papers refer to Roger North, who accompanied his rela- sent away by order of Thomas, Earl of Thanet. tive the Chief Justice (afterwards Lord Keeper)

(P. 316. note.) on the Circuit, and visited Appleby Castle soon

The friend, to whom I have already referred, - after the Countess's death. He speaks of her as

states, that he saw the folio volumes as late as the a magnificent and learned lady." “It was said,” year 1843; and also that “loose in one volume he adds, “that Hales (sic), afterwards Chief

was a birthday letter from the Countess to her ** Justice, assisted her in the perusal and methodizing father when aged eight or nine, much like a

of her evidences and muniments, and made her modern valentine.” In addition to the larger fair extracts of them.”

Diaries, Whitaker mentions “an original book We cannot but mark the ungracious terms in of accounts, filled with memoranda relative to which Hale's labours are alluded to both by Lady Anne's education, from 1600 to 1602,” - Whitaker and Coleridge. The former, who has from which he has given extracts. Was this com

largely availed himself of them, coolly observes pletely distinct from the other documents ? that

Pennant, who has devoted some pages to Skipton

Castle, and to the Cliffords, mentions the Countess “ Ingenuous curiosity, and perhaps too the necessary in; Margaret's letters as extant in manuscript, and also vestigation of her claims to the baronies of the family, led her diary, and that of her daughter ; " the former diffuse, not always an accurate work, in which more mentions," he says, “ several minutid that I omit, perhaps might have been expected from the assistance of being only proofs of her great attention to acSir Matthew Hale, who, though a languid writer, was a curacy."† It is pretty clear that this last obman of great acuteness and comprehension.” History of servation applies to the Lady Anne I, not to her Craven, p. 313.

mother. In terms not more complimentary Coleridge The following letter in my possession, addressed says:

to Ritson, is in manuscript, but though not pub“Lady Anne herself made a digest of the family re

lished in his correspondence (1833), it may have cords, with the assistance of Sir Matthew Hale. We re appeared elsewhere in print. The writer, John gret to say that, from the specimen we have seen, the Baynes, Esq., of Embsay, near Bolton Abbey (to learned judge seems to have contrived to shed a sombre, whom reference has already been made), was a judicial dulness over the composition. He was much Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. Having more interested about the tenures, leases, and other legal antiquities, than about the wild adventures, loves, and gained the highest honours in the university, and wars of the ancient house." Biographia Borealis, p. 243. Did these writers expect that, whilst engaged in

* Observations on the Mountains and Lakes of Cumbersuch a laborious and unimaginative occupation as

land and Westmoreland, vol. ii. pp. 161. 164.

Tour in Scotland, vol. ii. p. 358. a digest of grants and charters, “thoughts that

† “ With a Shandean exactness, very unusual among

female autobiographers in these days, Lady Anne begins * Romance of the Peerage, vol. iv. p. 141.

her memoirs of herself nine months before her nativity, † Anecdotes of some distinguished Persons, vol. iv. | for the sake of introducing a beautiful quotation from

Psalm cxxxix. 12—16.” - Biographia Borealis, p. 269.

p. 302.

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