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an effect, which should be performed alone by pleasurable sensation. One, who was soon to be married to a lady of superior condition to his own, expressed fear of not succeeding on the wedding night; he was advised to take a grain of opium before he went to bed, and to accustom himself to sleep with a woman previously, but not to enjoy her, to take off his bashfulness; which succeeded to his wish. Mr. John Hunter in his work on the Venereal Disease, has given an ingenious section on this subject of mental impotence, in which he relates a successful mode of treatment. He prevailed on a person in this situation to promise on his honour to pass six nights in bed with a young woman without attempting to have connection with her, whatever might be his power or inclination. He afterwards assured Mr. Hunter, that this resolution had -produced such a total alteration in the state of his mind, that the power of connection soon recurred, for instead of going to bed with the fear of inability; he went with fears, that he should be pos. sessed with too much desire, and too much power, so as to become uneasy to him, which really happened, as he would have been happy to have shortened the time; and when he had once broken the spell, his mind and powers went on together; and his mind never returned to its former state. A gentleman about 50 years of age, who had lived too freely, as he informed me, both in respect to

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to wine and women, complained, that his desire for the sex remained, and that he occasionally parted with semen, but with defect of a perfect tensio penis, and that he had tried 20 drops of laudanum, and 20 drops of tincture of cantharides on going to bed without effect; and that as the debility or hirritability of the system in this case rather than any mental affection seemed to be a part of the cause, he was advised to stimulate the sphinéter ani by the introduction of a piece of the root of ginger, as is done by the horse dealers to salehorses. And, however ridiculous the operation may appear, he assured me, that it succeeded; which I suppose might be owing to the sympathy between the sphinéter ani and the penis; which is so often the cause of painful sensation in the former, when a stone at the neck of the bladder affects the latter; and conversely when painful piles affect the reëtum, a strangury is sometimes produced by sympathy. For restoring the venereal power M. Le Roy thinks phosphorus taken in the dose of a quarter of a grain rubbed with oil or yolk of egg, or honey; or even the acid of phosphorus, to possess great efficacy. Med. Review, Vol. V. p. 204. The water in which phosphorus has been kept some time, probably possesses some of this acid, and is also recommended by M. Le Roy. I ought here to add, that I have been lately informed, that a gentleman directed four grains of phosphorus to

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be made into pills with conserve, with design of increasing his venereal power. He was seized with intolerable sense of heat at his stomach, pulse feeble, but not quickened, livid countenance, foreness of his bowels to the touch, and incessant vomitings, by which he at last brought up some blood. His illness lasted five or six days. He did not acknowledge any cause of his sudden illness, but said he was certain emetics would cure him, and took two by his own request. After his death, the apothecary mentioned his having directed the pills as above, which were made three days before he was taken ill; and he was believed to have taken about half of them.

M. M. Chalybeates. Opium, Bark. Tincture of cantharides.

4. Sterilitas. Barrenness. One of the ancient medical writers asserts, that the female sex become pregnant with most certainty at or near the time of menstruation. This is not improbable, since these monthly periods seem to resemble the monthly venereal orgasm of some female quadrupeds, which become pregnant at those times only; and hence the computation of pregnancy is not often erroneous, though taken from the last menstruation. See Section XXXVI. 2. 3.

M. M. Opium a grain every night. Chalybeates in very small doses. Bark. Sea-bathing.

5. In/en/ibilitas

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6. Dysuria insensitiva. Insensibility of the bladder. A difficulty or total inability to make water attends some fevers with great debility, owing to the insensibility or inirritability of the bladder. This is a dangerous but not always a fatal symptom. See Class III. 2. I. 6.

M. M. Draw off the water with a catheter. Assist the patient in the exclusion of it by compressing the lower parts of the abdomen with the hands. Wine two ounces, Peruvian bark one dram in decoction, every three hours alternately. Balsam of copaiva. Oil of almonds, with as much camphor as can be dissolved in it, applied as a liniment rubbed on the region of the bladder and perinaeum, and repeated every four hours, was used in this disease with success by Mr. Latham. Med. Comment. 1791, p. 213.

7. Accumulatio alvina. An accumulation of feces in the rectum, occasioned by the torpor, or insensibility, of that bowel. But as liquids pass by these accumulations, it differs from the consti

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