Discurso pronunciado en los funerales del C. Benito Juarez, presidente de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos

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Imp. de F. Diaz de Leon y S. White, 1872 - 20 pages
 

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Page 17 - They shall be bound to receive and consider all written documents or statements which may be presented to them by or on behalf of the respective governments in support of or in answer to any claim...
Page 18 - Washington, in gold or its equivalent, within twelve months from the close of the commission, to the government in favor of whose citizens the greater amount may have been awarded, without interest or any other deduction than that specified in Article VI.
Page 17 - Majesty during the same period, which may have been presented to either Government for its interposition with the other, and which yet remain unsettled...
Page 18 - Commission as a full, perfect and final settlement of all such claims as are mentioned in Article XII of this Treaty upon either Government ; and further engage that every such claim, whether or not the same may have been presented to the notice of, made, preferred, or laid before the said Commission...
Page 17 - February, 1848, and which yet remain unsettled, as well as any other such claims which may be presented within...
Page 17 - Agent to present and support claims on its behalf and to answer claims made upon it, and to represent it generally in all matters connected with the investigation and decision thereof.
Page 21 - Weil and the sincerity of the evidence as to the measure of damages insisted upon and accorded in the case of the La Abra Silver Mining Company...
Page 20 - The presentation by a citizen of a fraudulent claim or false testimony for reference to the commission was an imposition on his own government, and if that government afterwards discovered that it had in this way been made an instrument of wrong towards a friendly power, it would be not only its right, but its duty, to repudiate the act and make reparation as far as possible for the consequences of its neglect, if any there had been.
Page 20 - International arbitration must always proceed on the highest principles of national honor and integrity. Claims presented and evidence submitted to such a tribunal must necessarily bear the impress of the entire good faith of the government from which they come, and it is not to be presumed that any government will for a moment allow itself knowingly to be made the instrument of wrong in any such proceeding.
Page 21 - Government as to the cases hereinafter named, and if he shall be of the opinion that the honor of the United States, the principles of public law, or considerations of justice and equity...

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