A New Era of Thought

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S. Sonnenschein & Company, 1888 - Fourth dimension - 216 pages
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Page 4 - ... It is impossible to find a point in the body which could not be arrived at by travelling in combinations of the three directions already taken. But why should space be limited to three independent directions? Geometers have found that there is no reason why bodies which we can measure should thus be limited. As a matter of fact all the bodies which we can measure are thus limited. So we come to this conclusion, that the space which we use for conceiving ordinary objects in the world is limited...
Page 18 - ... into two classes: those which create the faculty of arrangement, and those which use it and exercise it. Mathematics exercises it, but I do not think it creates it; and unfortunately, in mathematics as it is now often taught, the pupil is launched into a vast system of symbols: the whole use and meaning of symbols (namely, as means to acquire a clear grasp of facts) is lost to him. . . . Of the possible units which will serve for the study of arrangement, I take the cube; and I have found that...
Page 66 - Hinton feels that with the expansion of the space-sense our vision of the world will change completely, and he tells about this in his book, A New Era of Thought, (p. 66.) The conception which we shall form of the universe will undoubtedly be as different from our present one, as the Copernican view differs from the more pleasant view of a wide, immovable earth beneath a vast vault. Indeed, any conception of our place in the universe will be more agreeable than the thought of being on a spinning...
Page 94 - Space the Scientific Basis of Altruism and Religion," Hinton says: . . . When we come upon infinity in any mode of our thought, it is a sign that that mode of thought is dealing with a higher reality than it is adapted for, and in struggling to represent it, can only do so by an infinite number of terms (of realities of a higher order).
Page 2 - Very often a statement \ i • . •• which seems to be very deep and abstruse and hard to grasp, is simply the form into which deep thinkers. have thrown a very simple and practical observation. And for the present let us look on Kant's great doctrine of space from a practical point of view, and it comes to...
Page 6 - Transl. one in imperfedt form — a new horizon opens. The mind acquires a development of power, and in this use of ampler space as a mode of thought, a path is opened by using that very truth which, when first stated by Kant, seemed to close the mind within such fast limits. Our perception is subject to the condition of being in space. But space is not limited as we at first think. The next step after having formed this power of conception in ampler space, is to investigate nature and see what phenomena...
Page 6 - The thought of past ages has used the conception of a three-dimensional space, and by that means has classified many phenomena and has obtained rules for dealing with matters of great practical utility. The path which opens immediately before us in the future is that of applying the conception of four-dimensional space to the phenomena of nature, and of investigating what can be found out by this new means of apprehension.
Page 52 - The relationship of a surface to a solid or of a solid to a higher solid is one which we often find in nature. A surface is nothing more nor less than the relation between two things. Two bodies touch each other. The surface is the relationship of one to the other. If our space is in the same co-relation with higher space as is the surface to our space, then it may be that our space is really the surface, that is, the place of contact, of two higher-dimensional spaces. It is a fact worthy of notice...
Page 86 - Co. right down to every minute part in its right position, and conceive its aspect, we should have a four-dimensional picture which is a solid structure. Now, to do this, we must form the habit of mental painting, that is, of putting definite colours in definite positions, not with our hands on paper, but with our minds in thought, so that we can recall, alter, and view complicated arrangements of colour existing in thought with the same ease with which we can paint on canvas. This is simply an affair...
Page 68 - ... usually in the remote depths of memory, in the past; all that lies at a remote distance from him; all that lies in the future. CH Hinton very well says, in regard to beings of other sections of the world: By the same process by which we know about the existence of other men around us, we may know of the high intelligences by whom we are surrounded. We feel them but we do not realize them. To realize them it will be necessary to develop our power of preception. The power of seeing with our bodily...

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