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Books Books 1 - 10 of 12 on An artificial machine or method for the impressing or transcribing of letters singly....
" An artificial machine or method for the impressing or transcribing of letters singly or progressively one after another, as in writing, whereby all writings whatsoever may be engrossed in paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished... "
Patents for inventions. Abridgments of specifications - Page 2
1869
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Reference index of patents of invention, from 1617 to 1852, by B. Woodcroft ...

Patent office - 1855
...after another, as in writing, whereby all writings whatsoever may be engrossed in paper or parehment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from...print; that the said machine or method may be of great vsc in settlements and publick recors, the impression being deeper and more lasting than any other...
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The Strand Magazine, Volume 13

George Newnes - 1897
...progressively, one after another, as in writing, whereby all writings whatsoever may be engrossed on paper or parchment, so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from print." Thus was the typewriter born. No drawings were submitted with the specifications, so that it is now...
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The Universal Cyclopaedia, Volume 12

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1900
...or progressively, one after another in writing, whereby all writings whatsoever may be engrossed on paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from print." This machine, however, was not perfected, and no description of it exists. The first typewriter invented...
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Every where ..., Volumes 27-28

Will Carleton - 1910
...progressively, one after another, as in writing, whereby all writings whatsover may be engrossed on the paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from print." This machine, although of very little practical use, furnished the idea from which sprang the efficient...
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Appleton's new practical cyclopedia: a new work of reference based upon the ...

Marcus Benjamin, Arthur Elmore Bostwick, Gerald Van Casteel, George Jotham Hagar - Reference - 1910
...or progressively, one after another in writing, whereby all writings whatsoever may be engrossed on paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from print." This machine, however, was not perfected, and no description of it exists. The first typewriter invented...
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The Story of the Typewriter, 1873-1923: Published in Commemoration of the ...

Herkimer County Historical Society - Type-writers - 1923 - 138 pages
...or progressively one after another, as in writing, whereby all writings whatsoever may be engrossed in paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to...of great vse in settlements and publick recors, the impression being deeper and more lasting than any other writing, and not to be erased or counterfeited...
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The World's Work: A History of Our Time, Volume 46

1923
...or progressively, one after another, as in writing, whereby all writing whatsoever may be engrossed in paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from print." But although Mill claimed that he had "lately invented and brought to perfection" THE LATE JOHN SIDDALL...
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Publications of the Buffalo Historical Society, Volume 25

Buffalo Historical Society (Buffalo, N.Y.) - Buffalo (N.Y.) - 1921
...or Progressively one after another as in Writing, whereby all Writing whatever may be Engrossed on Paper or Parchment, so Neat and Exact as not to be distinguished from Print." It sounds well ; and the ancient printing of the record, with many capitals and much emphasis of italics,...
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Henry's Attic: Some Fascinating Gifts to Henry Ford and His Museum

Ford Richardson Bryan, Sarah Evans - Art - 1995 - 432 pages
...progressively, one after another as in writing, whereby all writings whatsoever may be embossed on paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from print." Although the inventor evidently had great expectations that such a device would discourage forgers...
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The Computer and the Page: Publishing, Technology, and the Classroom

James Robert Kalmbach - Business & Economics - 1997 - 145 pages
...for the impressing or transcribing of letters . . . whereby all writings whatsoever may be engrossed in paper or parchment so neat and exact as not to be distinguished from print" (quoted in Blanchard, 1981, p. E-2). No drawing or models exist of Mill's machine. It would be another...
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