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INDIAN AND CIVIL WARS

VIRGINIA,

In The Yeahs 1675 And 1676.

PUBLISHED FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT, IN THE FIRST

VOLUME (SECOND SERIES) OF THE COLLECTIONS OF

THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

BOSTON; * •'

PRINTED BY JOHN ELIOT, NO 5, COURT STREET.

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LETTER FROM THE HON. WILLIAM A. BURWELL, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF VIRGINIA, TO THE HON. J0SIAH 0.UINCY, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS.

Washington, December 20th, 1812.

Dear Sir, The Manuscript copy of Bacon and Ingram's Rebellion was found among the papers of the late Capt. Nathaniel Burwell, of King William County.—I have not been able to obtain many particulars from his family relative to it.

At the close of the war he heard of its existence in an old and respectable family of the Northern Neck of Virginia, and procured it for his amusement; he entertained no doubt of its antiquity, and valued it on that account.

From the appearance of the work, the minute and circumstantial detail of facts, the orthography, and the style, I am perfectly satisfied his opinion was correct.—I hope it will be found worthy of a place in the valuable collections of the Society to which you belong.

Permit me to offer my best wishes for the success of your labours. Yours, respectfully,

WILLIAM A. BURWELL,

Of Virginia.

The Indians Proseedings. *

# # * * *' * * * * # *

for their owne security. They found that their store was too short to indure a long seige, without making emty bellies and that emty bellies makes weake hearts, which alway makes an unfit serving man to wait upon the God of War. Therefore they were resolve, before that their spirits were downe, to do what they could to keepe their stores up, as oppertunitie should befriend them: and allthough they were by the law of armes (as the case now stood) prohibited the hunting of wilde deare, they resolved to see what good might be don by hunting tame horsses: which trade became their sport soe long, that those who came on horseback to the seige began to feare they should be compeld to trot hom on foot, and glad if they scap'd so too, for these belegured blades made so many s'alleys, and the beseigers kep such neglegent gards, that there was very few days past without som remarkeable mischiefe. But what can hold out allways? even stone walls yields to the not-to-be gaine saide summons of time. And allthough it is saide that the Indians doth the least minde their bellies (as being content with a little) of any people in the world, yet now their bellies began to minde them, and their stomachs too, which began to be more inclinable to peace than war; which was the cause (no more horse-flesh being to be had) that they sent out 6 of their Woerowances (chief men) to commence a treaty. What the artickles were that they brought along with them to treate of I doe not know, but certainely they were so unacceptable to the English, that they caused the Commissioners braines to be knock'd out for dictating so badly to

•We regret that the beginning of this Manuscript is missing, and that several parts were so much torn that it became necessary to leave vacant spaces. Where the expression is uncertain, but the page not wholly disfigured, we have used itcUitk letters. Ed.

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