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Desert, or to my Wishes, it would never enable you to oblige a Man who would retain a more lively Sense of your Favours than does,

SIR,

Your most Humble,

And most Obliged Servant,

J. DENNIS.

THE

Enotron

dan disa

10-21-31 24664

THE

PREFACE

SHALL not at present

trouble the Reader with a I

Detail of the several Reasons which a long Time restrain'd me from making the folloze

ing Treatise English, tho' I was very much press'd to it. But I am oblig'd to acquaint him, that when I found it had been done by another Hand, with Notes, in which the Ashes of the venerable Author were poorly and meanly insulted by low and vile Buffoonry, becoming neither the Gravity of a Clergyman, nor the Faith of a Christian, nor the Justness and Spirit of a polite Writer, nor the Honour and Humanity of a Gentleman, I was provok'd to translate the foresaid Treatise anew, that I might have an opportunity by this Translation to do Justice to the Merit of the excellent Author, with Regard to those who are not yet acquainted with his Works ;

an

an Author famous through the Learned World for bis fublime and noble Writings; esteem'd by all the Learned World, one of its shining Ornaments, an Honour to Great Britain, and to buman Nature ; an Author in his Kind so admirable, that the understanding, impartial Reader will find even in this imperfect, rough drawn Copy, Things that are fúblimely beautiful.

I believe that the most inveterate of Dr. Burnet's Enemies, will not for his own Sake appear so malicious, as to affirm that that great Man had a Dehgn to impose upon bis Contemporaries, and upon Posterity; I say upon Pofterity, to which his works will certainly descend :

He shews every where too magnanimous a Soul for that. No Man seems to me ever to have abborr'd Falsbood more. I will not pretend to fay that he is without Error, no human Writer either is, or was, or ever will be without it. The greatest of Men both may and must err; but if we are to judge, as in Equity we ought, of the Profe of a Writer, by the same Rule by which Horace judg’d of the Verses of bis Contemporaries, Ubi plura nitent in Carmine, non ego paucis, offendar maculis, &c. Then will I venture to affirm, that if Dr. Burnet bas Errors, he has Beauties, and great Beauties, fufficient to make an ample and a glorious Amends for them.

THE

THE

CONT EN T S.

HE Introduction : The Subject, and the Method of handling it.

Page 1

T

CHAP. I.

That human Felicity does not depend solely

upon this Life, but that we are to expect a future State.

3

CHAP. II.

That the human soul is an immortal Sub

stance distinct from the Body, and from all Matter.

18

CHAP. III.

What will be the future Condition of the Soul after the Diffolution of the Body; or of

the the Middle State of Souls in the Interval between Death and the Resurrection, as to the Degrees of Happinefs or Misery? 49

CHAP. IV.

Of the State of Nature, in which departed

Souls are in the Interval between Death and the Resurrection. Whether they are naked and separated from all corporeal Substance, or whether they are united to an aërial, or any other Body?

106

CHAP. V.

Transition to the remaining Parts of this Work;

and, first, concerning the Coming of Christ, and the Conflagration of the World? 125

CH AP. VỊ.

Of the last Judgment: A View of its prin

cipal Appearances ; of its Manner, End, and Effect.

CHAP. VII.

Of the Resurrection of the Dead; and in

what State they will be after they are risen, and what Sort of Bodies they will have. 180

CHAP. VIII.

What sort of Body we are to have at the Re

furrection? the same that we have at prefent, or a different one?

231 СНАР.

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