Zoonomia; Or, The Laws of Organic Life ...

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Page 234 - And there went forth a wind from the LORD, and brought quails from the sea, and let them fall by the camp, as it were a day's journey on this side, and as it were a day's journey on the other side, round about the camp, and as it were two cubits high upon the face of the earth.
Page vii - THE purport of the following pages is an endeavour to reduce the facts belonging to ANIMAL LIFE into classes, orders, genera, and species; and, by comparing them with each other, to unravel the theory of diseases.
Page 225 - Mr. Leonard, a very intelligent friend of mine, saw a cat catch / a trout by darting upon it in a deep clear water, at the mill at Weaford, near Lichfield. The cat belonged to Mr. Stanley, who had often seen her catch fish in the same manner in summer, when the mill-pool was drawn so low that the fish could be seen. I have heard of other cats taking fish in shallow water, as they stood on the bank. This...
Page 181 - Reasoning," says one of the most ingenious, and original of these, "is that operation of the sensorium, by which we excite two or many tribes of ideas ; and then re-excite the ideas, in which they differ or correspond. If we determine this difference, it is called judgment ; if we in vain endeavour to determine it, it is called doubting. If we re-excite the ideas in which they differ, it is called distinguishing ; if we re-excite those in which they correspond, it is called comparing.
Page 178 - Tooke has shown," (I quote Darwin's own words) " that what were called general ideas, are in reality only general terms : Whence arises much error in our verbal reasonings : And...
Page 201 - ... of our mother. And thus we find, according to the ingenious idea of Hogarth, that the waving lines of beauty were originally taken from the temple of Venus. This animal attraction is love; which is a sensation, when the object is present; and a desire, when it is absent.
Page 314 - ... previoufly to the irritative ones, as occurs in moft dying perfons. Another way of procuring fleep mechanically was related to me by Mr. Brindley, the famous canal engineer, who was brought up to the...
Page 200 - When the babe, soon after it is born into this cold world, is applied to its mother's bosom, its sense of perceiving warmth is first agreeably affected ; next its sense of smell is delighted with the odour of her milk; then its taste is gratified by the flavour of it, afterwards the appetites of hunger and of thirst afford pleasure by the possession of their objects, and by the subsequent...
Page 201 - ... we feel a general glow of delight, which seems to influence all our senses; and, if the object be not too large, we experience an attraction to embrace it with our arms, and to salute it with our lips, as we did in our early infancy the bosom of our mother.
Page 263 - A wasp, on a gravel walk, had caught a fly nearly as large as himself; kneeling on the ground I observed him separate the tail and the head from the body part, to which the wings were attached. He then took the body part in his paws, and rose about two feet from the ground with it; but a gentle breeze wafting the wings of the fly turned him round in the air, and he settled again with his prey upon the gravel. I then distinctly observed him cut off with his mouth, first one of the wings, and then...

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