The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament

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Fortress Press - Religion - 314 pages
Brooke illuminates the first-century world shared by the Qumran community and the writers of the New Testament. The Dead Sea Scrolls have provided Old Testament scholars with an enormous wealth of data for textual criticism as well as theology. But, as Brooke skillfully demonstrates, New Testament scholars can use the Scrolls to learn more about the linguistic, historical, religious, and social contexts of Palestine in the first century. A wide range of topics and themes is discussed, including Matthew's Beatitudes, the lost song of Miriam, Levi and the Levites, women's authority, and the use of scripture in the parable of the vineyard.
 

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Contents

The Qumran Scrolls and the Study of the New Testament
1
Jesus the Dead Sea Scrolls and Scrolls Scholarship
17
The Canon within the Canon at Qumran and in the New Testament
25
Biblical Interpretation in the Qumran Scrolls and the New Testament
50
Shared Intertextual Interpretations in the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament
68
Particular Scrolls Illuminate their New Testament Counterparts
93
The Temple Scroll and the New Testament
95
Levi and the Levites in the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament
113
The Scrolls and the Gospels Mutual Illumination of Particular Passages
213
The Wisdom of Matthews Beatitudes
215
4Q500 1 and the Use of Scripture in the Parable of the Vineyard
233
Qumran The Cradle of the Christ?
259
Songs of Revolution The Song of Miriam and its Counterparts
270
4Q252 and the 153 Fish of John 2111
280
Select Bibliography
296
Index of Bible References
300

The Apocryphon of Leviᵇ? and the Messianic Servant High Priest
138
LukeActs and the Qumran Scrolls The Case of MMT
156
The Commentary on Genesis A and the New Testament
175
From Qumran to Corinth Embroidered Allusions to Womens Authority
193

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