1. On the constitution of the Church and State ... ii. Lay sermons. Ed. with notes by H.N. Coleridge

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Page 203 - For he established a testimony in Jacob, and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers, that they should make them known to their children: 6 That the generation to come might know them, even the children which should be born : who should arise and declare them to their children: 7 That they might set their hope in God, and not forget the' works of God, but keep his commandments...
Page 327 - For they have healed the hurt of the daughter of my people slightly, saying, "Peace, peace!
Page 41 - Than all the oratory of Greece and Rome. In them is plainest taught, and easiest learnt, What makes a nation happy, and keeps it so, What ruins kingdoms, and lays cities flat; These only with our law best form a king.
Page 250 - For this cause I bow my knees unto the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, of whom the whole family in heaven and earth is named, that he would grant you, according to the riches of his glory, to be strengthened with might by his Spirit in the inner man, that Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith...
Page 212 - The men of Nineveh shall rise in judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it ; because they repented at the preaching of Jonas : and, behold, a greater than Jonas is here.
Page 236 - Stand now with thine enchantments, and with the multitude of thy sorceries, Wherein thou hast laboured from thy youth ; If so be thou shalt be able to profit, if so be thou mayest prevail.
Page 78 - It cannot be valued with the gold of Ophir, with the precious onyx, or the sapphire.
Page 211 - For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale's belly ; so shall the son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.
Page 333 - The words of a wise man's mouth are gracious; but the lips of a fool will swallow up himself. 1 3 The beginning of the words of his mouth is foolishness: and the end of his talk is mischievous madness.
Page 226 - But to find no contradiction in the union of old and new, to contemplate the ANCIENT OF DAYS with feelings as fresh, as if they then sprang forth at his own fiat, this characterizes the minds that feel the riddle of the world, and may help to unravel it!

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