Page images
PDF
EPUB

Bulletin 1932

No. 18

Adjustment of Behavior Problems

of School Children

A Description and Evaluation of the Clinical Program
in Berkeley, Calif

1932
18-21

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][merged small]

ELISE H. MARTENS
Senior Specialist in the Education of Exceptional Children

Office of Education

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

CONTENTS

Page

V 1 5 5

14

29

Letter of transmittal...
Introduction....
Part I. A description of organization and method.
Chapter I. The organization of the program

II. Some clinical pictures---
Part II. An experimental evaluation..
Chapter I. The experimental procedure

II. Statistical problems involved..
III. Initial comparison of the problem and nonproblem

groups---
IV. Final comparison of the problem and nonproblem groups.

V. The problem control group---

VI. Summary and interpretation of the experiment.---
Selected references...
Appendix-Selected forms used in the experiment..

29 36

41

49

58 62 70 71

TABLES

38 41

43

45

47

50

Table 1. Means of ratings given specific behavior traits by two groups of

judges, together with the resultant value assigned each trait.
2. Statistical picture of problem and nonproblem groups ---
3. Behavior problems reported for 109 problem children (initial

record)-----
4. Behavior problems reported for 109 nonproblem children (initial

record)----
6. Behavior problem scores of problem and nonproblem groups

(initial record).
6. First and last behavior problem scores of the experimental prob-

lem group---
7. Behavior problems reported for experimental problem group on

first and last records...
8. First and last behavior problem scores of the nonproblem con-

trol group---
9. Behavior problems reported for nonproblem control group on

first and last records.
10. Behavior problem scores of 68 pairs of problem and nonproblem

children (initial record)--
11. Behavior problem scores of 68 pairs of problem and nonproblem

children (final record).
12. Behavior problem scores of 50 problem children who were not

given clinical attention (problem control group)...

51

53

54

55

56

60

FIGURES

9 12

Figure 1. Organization of Berkeley Coordinating Council

2. Organization of program of child adjustment.
3. Fifty behavior difficulties rated by mental hygienists, psy-

chologists-educators, and classroom teachers..

40

III

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

OFFICE OF EDUCATION,

Washington, D. C., January, 1932. SIR: There is at the present time a strong movement to include in the school curriculum more preparation for character education. The schools have long recognized their obligations in this respect but more progress has not been made because they did not know how to bring it about. With the coming of trained psychologists, psychiatrists, and other specialists, we are beginning to study the problem cases. When enough pupils of the type of Joe, Ruby, Willard, Marion, Neil, and Raymond have been studied as carefully as these children were in Berkeley, and their records compared with a group ordinarily considered normal, we shall begin to have information on which a curriculum for the socially maladjusted child may be built. Doctor Martens is giving special attention to this work in the country.

This report represents the first of a series of research studies in the education of exceptional children to be planned cooperatively by the United States Office of Education and selected school systems. Deep appreciation for their interest and cooperation is expressed to Dr. Lewis W. Smith, superintendent, Berkeley public schools; Dr. Virgil E. Dickson, assistant superintendent of schools, under whose immediate direction the experiment was carried on; Miss Margarita McGovney, assistant director of the bureau of research and guidance; Dr. V. H. Podstata and Dr. Louise Hector, physicians; and all administrative and teaching assistants who had a part in the development of the project. The general guidance and counsel given by members of the Department of Education at Stanford University are also gratefully acknowledged. The Office of Education is putting out the report in order that its findings may become generally known.

I think that this manuscript represents a worthy achievement and respectfully recommend that it be printed as a bulletin of this office. Respectfully submitted.

WM. JOHN COOPER,

Commissioner.

V

« PreviousContinue »