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The proposed Everglades National Park lies in the only tropical part of the United States, and if this park is established, it will be the only one of its kind in the entire country. While most of our national parks contain primarily geological features, this proposed park is outstanding for its biological features. Since the inception of the movement to create national parks one of the primary reasons has been for the preservation of unique areas for future generations as well as to provide methods whereby these areas may be visited to-day.

At open hearings which were conducted by the Public Lands Committee, beginning Monday, December 15, testimony was given calling attention to the wonderful tropical flora and fauna in this area. The rare animal and bird life which exists only in this part of our country was called to our attention by people who had been visiting these everglades for years and years and were well qualified to give detailed information as to these subjects. Director Horace M. Albright appeared before the committee personally and testified that this area was up to national park standards and pointed out the desirability of placing this area under the National Park Service as one of our national parks. Dr. H. C. Bumpus, of Brown University, Providence, R. I., pointed out to the committee the true worth of this area as a national park and also the necessity for preserving it for our future generations. Dr. T. Gilbert Pearson, president of the Audubon Societies, described the rare bird life in this part of Florida and made a plea that they be preserved rather than be exterminated as is now the

Other well-known authorities and scientists including such gentlemen as Mr. Harlan P. Kelsey, member of the Southern Appalachian National Park Commission, Salem, Mass; Dr. John K. Small, head curator of New York Botanical Garden; Dr. Howard A. Kelly, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.; Dr. Paul Bartsch, curator National Museum, Washington, D. C.; and Mr. Ernest F. Coe, landscape architect and chairman of the Tropic Everglades Park Association appeared before the committee. These men are all well trained in their particular lines of work and speak from actual experience in this tropical land. All strongly indorse the creating of a national park in this section of the country.

A letter from the Secretary of the Interior addressed to the Chairman of the Public Lands Committee of the House under date of December 11, 1930, is also made a part of this report and further explains the reasons for the enactment of this bill into law.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Washington, December 11, 1930. Hon. Don B. COLTON, Chairman Committee on the Public Lands,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR MR. COLTON: This will reply to your letter of May 20 last, inclosing copy of H. R. 12381, entitled “A bill to provide for the establishment of the Everglades National Park in the State of Florida, and for other purposes," with request for a report thereon.

The purpose of this bill is to provide for the establishment as a national park of an area in the Everglades region of Florida which Congress directed be investigated and reported on by the Secretary of the Interior by the act of March 1, 1929 (45 Stat. 1445). Pursuant to that act an inspection and detailed examination of the area was made last February on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior by officials of the National Park Service, assisted by several eminent park experts acting as collaborators, and the area found to measure up to the standards set

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for national parks. Full details of this inspection and the recommendations made pursuant thereto have been covered in my report to Congress submitted on December 3, 1930, as directed by the act of March 1, 1929.

The form of legislation proposed by H. R. 12381 has been carefully examined and is found to be similar to legislation heretofore enacted with respect to other eastern areas proposed as national parks and authorized by Congress for such establishment, and is substantially satisfactory. The following amendment, however, would correct an inconsistency between the title and body of the bili and is submitted for your consideration.

On page 2, line 5, delete the word “Tropic."

The title of the bill is to provide for the establishment of the “Everglades National Park,” whereas the designation “Tropic Everglades National Park” is given in the bill. The word “Tropic" appears to be unnecessary and undesirable, and it is therefore recommended that it be eliminated from the authorized name of this proposed park.

In conclusion I have to recommend that H. R. 12381, if amended as indicated above, be given favorable consideration by your committee. Very truly yours,

RAY LYMAN WILBUR.

VIADUCT ACROSS MAHONING RIVER AT STRUTHERS,

OHIO

JANUARY 13, 1932.—Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. COOPER of Ohio, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign

Commerce, submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 70]

The Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 70) granting the consent of Congress to the Board of County Commissioners of Mahoning County, Ohio, to construct a free overhead viaduct across the Mahoning River at Struthers, Mahoning County, Ohio, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it pass.

The bill has the approval of the War and Agriculture Departments, as will appear by the letters attached.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

December 21, 1931. Respectfully returned to the chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives.

So far as the interests committed to this department are concerned, I know of no objection to the favorable consideration of the accompanying bill (H. R. 70, 72d Cong., 1st sess.) granting the consent of Congress to the Board of County Commissioners of Mahoning County, Ohio, to construct a free overhead viaduct across the Mahoning River at Struthers, Mahoning County, Ohio.

PATRICK J. HURLEY,

Secretary of War.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, December 28, 1931. Hon. Sam RAYBURN, Chairman Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,

House of Representatives. DEAR MR. RAYBURN: Careful consideration has been given to the bill(H. R. 70) transmitted with your letter of December 16, with request for a report thereon and such views relative thereto as the department might desire to communicate.

This bill will authorize the Board of County Commissioners of Mahoning County, Ohio, to construct, maintain, and operate a free overhead viaduct, with necessary approaches thereto, across the Mahoning River at Struthers. The site of the proposed bridge is not on the system of Federal-aid highways, but the bill is without objection so far as this department is concerned. Sincerely yours,

R. W. DUNLAP, Acting Secretary.

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