Decisions of the Commissioner of Patents and of the United States Courts in Patent and Trade-mark and Copyright Cases

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1930 - Copyright
"Compiled from Official gazette. Beginning with 1876, the volumes have included also decisions of United States courts, decisions of Secretary of Interior, opinions of Attorney-General, and important decisions of state courts in relation to patents, trade-marks, etc. 1869-94, not in Congressional set." Checklist of U. S. public documents, 1789-1909, p. 530.

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Page 101 - ... notice to adverse parties and other due proceedings had, may adjudge that such applicant is entitled, according to law, to receive a patent for his invention, as specified in his claim, or for any part thereof, as the facts in the case may appear. And such adjudication, if it be in favor of the right of the applicant, shall authorize the commissioner to issue such patent on the applicant filing in the Patent Office a copy of the adjudication and otherwise complying with the requirements of law.
Page 232 - A treaty is, in its nature, a contract between two nations, not a legislative act. It does not generally effect, of itself, the object to be accomplished, especially so far as its operation is infra-territorial ; but is carried into execution by the sovereign power of the respective parties to the instrument.
Page 232 - Our constitution declares a treaty to be the law of the land. It is, consequently, to be regarded in courts of justice as equivalent to an act of the legislature, whenever it operates of itself without the aid of any legislative provision. But when the terms of the stipulation import a contract, when either of the parties engages to perform a particular act, the treaty addresses itself to the political, not the judicial department; and the legislature must execute the contract before it can become...
Page 280 - Any refusal of entry under this section shall continue in effect until the President shall find and instruct the Secretary of the Treasury that the conditions which led to such refusal of entry no longer exist. (h) DEFINITION. — When used in this section and in sections 338 and 340, the term
Page 46 - That no mark which consists merely in the name of an individual, firm, corporation, or association, not written, printed, impressed, or woven in some particular or distinctive manner...
Page 101 - ... and the court having cognizance thereof, on notice to adverse parties and other due proceedings had, may adjudge that such applicant le entitled, according to law, to receive a patent for his invention, as specified In his claim, or for any part thereof, as the facts in the case may appear.
Page 186 - That he was not the original and first inventor or discoverer of any material and substantial part of the thing patented; or, Fifth.
Page 307 - There is a substantial identity, constituting infringement, where a device is a copy of the thing described by the patentee, 'either without variation, or with such variations as are consistent with its being in substance the same thing.
Page 200 - ... a registered or known trade mark owned and in use by another and appropriated to merchandise of the same descriptive properties as to be likely to cause confusion or mistake in the mind of the public or to deceive purchasers shall not be registered...
Page 184 - The filing of a regular application for patent completely disclosing the invention is treated as equivalent to reduction to practice. The inventor who proves to be the first to conceive the invention and the first to reduce it to practice will be held to be the prior inventor, but more complicated situations cannot be stated this simply.

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