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Excellent and balanced analysis of the diversity and porous cultural bridges that still exist when in comes to the question of Metis identity across Canada; that is all parts of Canada and even North America. This book is a great addition to nuance the often cut and dry Metis nationalism we see in Western Canada. The author's analysis underlines the tendency of such nationalism to fall for newly constructed essentialist definition of the Metis Nation (as per defined by the Metis National Council), here often influenced more or less consciously by court definitions and/or fear of loosing what could be exclusive privileges granted by the government of Canada.  

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Many mixed blood Indians doubt their heritage and feel cut off from their roots. Lawrence puts the story into a personal perspective that includes a personal search, years passing before acknowledging that heritage, and a final attempt to confront the reasons why culture shame and silence was brought upon her family, in an attempt to rectify what hegemonic control is all about. The struggle to understand the differences between rural and urban Indians, as well as the struggle to explore and reclaim one's culture and defy assimilation in later life, are themes I see portrayed time and again. Her delving into "identity legislation" is on target and worthy of further study.  

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