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DISTANT VIEW OF THE ROMAN ARMY ENGAGING

THE BRITONS.

FROM THE TRAGEDY OF BONDUCA, SCENE V. ACT III,

See that huge battle moving from the mountains,
Their gilt coats shine like dragon scales, their march
Like a rough tumbling storm; see 'em,
And then see Rome no more. Say they fail ; look,
Look where the armed carts stand, a new army!
Look how they hang like falling rocks, as murdering
Death rides in triumph, Drusius, fell Destruction
Lashes his fiery horse, and round about him
His
many
thousand

ways

to let out souls. Move me again when they charge', when the moun

tain Melts under their hot wheels, and from their ax-trees Huge claps of thunder plough the ground before

them, Till then I'll dream what Rome was.

BONDUCA ATTACKED IN HER FORTRESS BY THE

ROMANS.

FROM THE SAME, SCENE IV. ACT IV.

Persons.-Suetonius, Junius, Decius, and other Romans. Bonduca

and her daughters with Nennius above. Sueton. Bring up the catapults, and shake the wall, We will not be outbray'd thus.

1 The Roman who makes this speech is supposed to be reclining, overcome with fatigue, and going to snatch a momentary repose.

Nennius. Shake the earth,
Ye cannot shake our souls. Bring up your rams,
And with their armed heads make the fort totter,
Ye do but rock us into death.

Junius. See, sir,
See the Icenian queen in all her glory
From the strong battlements proudly appearing,
As if she meant to give us lashes.

Decius. Yield, queen.
Bonduca. I'm unacquainted with that language,

Roman,
Sueton. Yield, honour'd lady, and expect our

mercy;
We love thy nobleness.

Bond. I thank ye, ye say well; But mercy

and love are sins in Rome and hell. Sueton. You cannot 'scape our strength, you must

yield, lady; You must adore and fear the power of Rome.

Bond. If Rome be earthly, why should any knee With bending adoration worship her? She's vicious, and your partial selves confess Aspires the height of all impiety. Therefore 'tis fitter I should reverence The thatched houses where the Britons dwell In careless mirth ; where the bless'd household gods See nought but chaste and simple purity. 'Tis not high power that makes a place divine, Nor that the men from gods derive their line; But sacred thoughts, in holy bosoms stor’d, Make people noble, and the place ador'd.

Sueton. Beat the wall deeper.

Bond. Beat it to the centre,
We will not sink one thought.

Sueton. I'll make ye.
Bond. No.
Second Daughter. Oh, mother, these are fearful

hours !-speak gently.

CARATACH, PRINCE OF THE BRITONS, WITH HIS

NEPHEW HENGO ASLEEP.

FROM SCENE III. ACT V. OF THE SAME.

Car. Sleep still, sleep sweetly, child; 'tis all thou

feed'st on: No gentle Briton near, no valiant charity To bring thee food. Poor knave, thou'rt sick, ex

treme sick, Almost grown wild for meat, and yet thy goodness Will not confess or shew it. All the woods Are double lin'd with soldiers, no way left us To make a noble 'scape. I'll sit down by thee, And when thou wak’st either get meat to save thee, Or lose my life i’the purchase. Good gods comfort

thee!

Enter CARATAch and Hengo on the rock.
Car. Courage, my boy, I've found meat: look,

Hengo,
Look, where some blessed Briton, to preserve thee,

Has hung a little food and drink. Cheer up, boy, Do not forsake me now.

Hengo. Oh! uncle, uncle, I feel I cannot stay long; yet I'll fetch it To keep your noble life. Uncle, I'm heart whole, And would live.

Car. Thou shalt, long, I hope.

Hengo. But—my head, uncleMethinks the rock

goes

round.
Enter Macer and JUDAS, Romans.
Macer. Mark 'em well, Judas.
Judas. Peace, as you love your life.

Hengo. Do not you hear
The noise of bells ?

Car. Of bells, boy? 'tis thy fancy.
Alas! thy body's full of wind.

Hengo. Methinks, sir,
They ring a strange sad knell, a preparation
To some near funeral of state. Nay, weep not.
Car. Oh! my poor

chicken.
Hengo. Fye, faint-hearted uncle;
Come, tie me in your belt, and let me down.

Car. I'll go myself, boy.

Hengo. No; as you love me, uncle, I will not eat it if I do not fetch it, The danger only I desire; pray tie me. Car. I will, and all my care hang o'er thee, Come,

child, My valiant child.

Hengo. Let me down apace, uncle,

And

you shall see how like a daw I'll whip it
From all their policies; for 'tis most certain
A Roman train. And you must hold me sure too,
You'll spoil all else. When I have brought it, uncle,
We'll be as merry-

Car. Go i'the name of heav'n, boy.
Hengo. Quick, quick, uncle, I have it. Oh!

[JUDAS shoots Hengo.
Car. What ail'st thou ?
Hengo. Oh! my best uncle, I am slain.
Car. I see you-

[Kills JUDAs with a stone.
And heav'n direct my hand! Destruction
Go with thy coward soul! How dost thou, boy?
Oh! villain-

Hengo. Oh! uncle, uncle !
Oh! how it pricks me; extremely pricks me.

Car. Coward rascal !
Dogs eat thy flesh!

Hengo. O, I bleed hard-I faint too-out upon't ! How sick I am—the lean rogue, uncle !

Car. Look, boy, I've laid him sure enough.
Hengo. Have you knock'd out his brains ?
Car. I warrant thee, for stirring more. Cheer

up, child.

Hengo. Hold my sides hard; stop, stop; oh!

wretched fortuneMust we part thus? Still I grow sicker, uncle.

Car. Heav'n look upon this noble child."

Hengo. I once hop'd I should have liv'd to have met these bloody Romans

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