Page images
PDF
EPUB

41. $. Confessio itouse.
DIGEST, ANALYSIS, AND INDEX OF TESTIMONY OF THE

HEARINGS

BEFORE A 4 - MAR 14
SUBCOMMITTEE OE-THE 1

:: COMMITTEE ON
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE.
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
EIGHTY-FOURTH CONGRESS

· SECOND SESSION

ON

H. R. 6141 and H. R. 6142
BILLS TO AMEND THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT,
AS AMENDED, SO AS TO PROVIDE FOR A STRONGER
NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY, AND

FOR OTHER PURPOSES
(AND RELATED BILLS)

Printed for the use of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE J. PERCY PRIEST, Tennessee, Chairman 1

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][ocr errors]

The Transportation Amendments Act of 1955, H. R. 6141, and H. R. 6142, originated as a result of recommendations presented for the consideration of President Eisenhower by the Presidential Advisory Committee on Transport Policy and Qrganization. The President established the Advisory Committee on July 12, 1954, under the chairmanship of Hon. Sinclair Weeks, Secretary of Commerce, with Hon. Charles E. Wilson, Secretary of Defense, and Hon. Arthur S. Flemming, Director, Office of Defense Mobilization, as members. Hon. George M. Humphrey, Secretary of the Treasury, Hon. Arthur E. Summerfield, Postmaster General, Hon. Ezra T. Benson, Secretary of Agriculture, and Hon. Howland R. Hughes, Director, Bureau of the Budget, were designated as participants on an ad hoc basis. The President directed the Advisory Committee to examine existing Federal transportation policies and programs for the purpose of determining their effect on the overall needs of the Nation. In his letter establishing the committee, he stated: The vital interests of this Nation require that the transportation industry of the United States maintain itself at maximum effectiveness. The Government must provide effective leadership in assuring that its policies and programs affecting the various forms of transportation, whose services are so necessary to the public and to industry and which have such a vital bearing upon the national Security, are best designed to aid them in performing fully the roles for which each is best suited. The Advisory Committee, on September 2, 1954, announced the appointment of a working group of transportation experts from outside the Government to assist in its task. Members of the working group were: Arthur W. Page, director, American Telephone & Telegraph Co., chairman. Charles H. Beard, general traffic manager, Union Carbide & Carbon Corp., New York City. Charles L. Dearing, senior staff member, Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. Fairman R. Dick, limited partner, Dick & Merle-Smith, New York City. George Roberts, partner, Winthrop, Stimson, Putman & Roberts, New York City. Arthur C. Schier, vice president for traffic, General Foods Corp., White Plains, N.Y. Ernest W. Williams professor, transportation, Columbia University, New York City. The Advisory Committee's report to the President, entitled “Revision of Federal Transportation Policy,” was released at the White

« PreviousContinue »