K9 Professional Tracking: A Complete Manual for Theory and Training

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Dog Training Press, Mar 13, 2018 - Pets - 156 pages

A well-trained tracking dog can be the deciding factor in both criminal investigations and search-and-rescue operations. When the stakes are high and you demand only top performance from your K9, you need training methods relied upon by police forces and searchand-rescue teams around the world.

Dr. Resi Gerritsen and Ruud Haak show you how to train your dog in clean-scent tracking, a proven method that trains dogs to follow a particular scent on a track while ignoring crosstracks and other odors. In K9 Professional Tracking, you’ll learn how to start a successful clean-scent tracking program from the ground up: how to pick the right dog, what equipment you need, how to lay a track, and which exercises work. Resi and Ruud also break down the science of scent and the dog’s nose, critical information that allows you to fully understand what your K9 is and is not capable of in the field. With the right knowledge and techniques, you’ll be able to train tracking dogs to the highest professional standards. 

 

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Contents

Preface
6
Introduction Tracking is
7
1 Scent and Perception
9
2 The Dogs Nose
17
3 The Odors of the Track
31
4 By the Sweat of Ones Feet
45
5 Equipment and Conditions
55
6 Common Training Methods
61
9 Scientific Aspects
95
10 Conditions for Success
105
11 Preliminary Exercises
113
12 Cleanscent Tracking
121
13 Weather Conditions
129
14 CrossTracks
135
15 The Limits of Tracking
139
Bibliography
149

7 Asking for Trouble
71
8 History of Tracking Research
79
About the Authors
153
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Dr. Resi Gerritsen and Ruud Haak are world-renowned specialists in the field of dog work and the authors of more than 30 titles on dog training. They train search and rescue dogs for the International Red Cross and the United Nations (Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs), and they have trained drug and explosive detector dogs for the Dutch police and the Royal Netherlands Air Force. Gerritsen and Haak also act as international judges for the International Rescue Dog Organization.

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