Beowulf (Bilingual Edition)

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Seamus Heaney
W. W. Norton & Company, Feb 17, 2001 - Poetry - 256 pages
13 Reviews

New York Times bestseller and winner of the Whitbread Award.

Composed toward the end of the first millennium, Beowulf is the elegiac narrative of the adventures of Beowulf, a Scandinavian hero who saves the Danes from the seemingly invincible monster Grendel and, later, from Grendel's mother. He then returns to his own country and dies in old age in a vivid fight against a dragon. The poem is about encountering the monstrous, defeating it, and then having to live on in the exhausted aftermath. In the contours of this story, at once remote and uncannily familiar at the beginning of the twenty-first century, Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney finds a resonance that summons power to the poetry from deep beneath its surface. Drawn to what he has called the "four-squareness of the utterance" in ?Beowulf? and its immense emotional credibility, Heaney gives these epic qualities new and convincing reality for the contemporary reader.

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The author did an excellent job in exploring the heroic phases of Beowulf's life which has an expanse of fifty years.
In his youth, Beowulf has the charisma of a great warrior with unrivaled
courage and strength. He is known for his loyalty, courtesy, and pride. His career as a distinguished warrior did prepped him for the throne. In his later years, Beowulf's remarkable respect for the throne endeared him a worthy king. 

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Amazing book!

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About the author (2001)

Seamus Heaney (1939—2013) was an Irish poet, playwright, translator, lecturer and recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born at Mossbawn farmhouse between Castledawson and Toomebridge, County Derry, he resided in Dublin until his death.

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