The History of Lynn

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Press of J. H. Eastburn, 1829 - Lynn (Mass.) - 260 pages
 

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Page 24 - Country, where she specially resideth, without much sadness of heart and many tears in our eyes, ever acknowledging that such hope and part as we have obtained in the common salvation we have received in her bosom, and sucked it from her breasts. " We leave it not therefore as loathing that milk wherewith we were nourished there ; but, blessing God for the parentage and education, as members of the same body, shall always rejoice in her good...
Page 2 - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the seventh day of May, AD 1828, in the fifty-second year of the Independence of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SG Goodrich, of the said District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit...
Page 35 - If barley be wanting to make into malt, We must be contented and think it no fault ; For we can make liquor to sweeten our lips Of pumpkins and parsnips and walnut-tree chips.
Page 2 - DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT: District Clerk's Office. Be it remembered, that on the...
Page 117 - ... instead of drawing out bars of iron for the country's use, there was hammered out nothing but contention and lawsuits...
Page 24 - The Humble Request of His Majesty's Loyall Subjects, the Governor and the Company late gone for New England; to the rest of their Brethren in and of the Church of England...
Page 35 - But when the Spring opens we then take the hoe, And make the ground ready to plant and to sow; Our corn being planted and seed being sown, The worms destroy much before it is grown; And when it is growing, some spoil there is made By birds and by squirrels that pluck up the blade; And when it is come to full corn in the ear, It is often destroyed by raccoon and by deer.
Page 24 - ... we desire you would be pleased to take notice of the principals and body of our Company, as those who esteem it our honor to call the Church of England, from whence we rise, our dear mother; and cannot part from our native Country, where she specially resideth, without much sadness of heart and many tears in our eyes, ever acknowledging that such hope and part as we have obtained in the common salvation .we have received in her bosom, and sucked it from her breasts.
Page 33 - Plowes, was Indian grain. — And let no man make a jest at Pumpkins, for with this food the Lord was pleased to feed his people to their good content, till Corne and Cattell were increased.
Page 34 - servants were privileged to rest from their labors, from ten of the clock till two.' The common address of men and women was Goodman and Goodwife ; none but those who sustained some office of dignity, or belonged to some respectable family, were complimented with the title of Master. In writing they seem to have had no capital F, and thus in the early records we find two small ones used instead, and one m with a dash over it stood for two.

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