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" The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused and interested you, because I was so unlike them. "
Pride and Prejudice - Page 392
by Jane Austen - 1918 - 401 pages
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Jane Austen

Mrs. Charles Malden - 1889 - 224 pages
...liveliness of your mind, I did.' " ' You may as well call it impertinence at once. It was very little less. The fact is that you were sick of civility, of deference,...disgusted with the women who were always speaking, arid looking, and thinking, for your approbation alone. I roused and interested you because I was so...
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Heroines of fiction, Volume 1

William Dean Howells - Fiction - 1901
...mind, I did.' 'You may as well call it impertinence at once. It was very little less. The fact is, you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious...yourself, your feelings were always noble and just. . . . There, I have saved you the trouble of accounting for it, and, all things considered, I begin...
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The Novels of Jane Austen, Volume 4

Jane Austen - 1905
...liveliness of your mind, I did.' ' You may as well call it impertinence at once. It was very little less. The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference,...officious attention. You were disgusted with the women 284 who were always speaking and looking and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused and interested...
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The novels and letters of Jane Austen, Volume 4

Jane Austen - 1906
...knew that I had begun." " My beauty you had early withstood, and as for my manners — my behaviour to you was at least always bordering on the uncivil,...thinking for your approbation alone. I roused and inter[286] ested you, because I was so unlike them. Had you not been really amiable, you would have...
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The Novels and Letters of Jane Austen, Volume 4

Jane Austen - 1915
...knew that I had begun." " My beauty you had early withstood, and as for my manners — my behaviour to you was at least always bordering on the uncivil,...thinking for your approbation alone. I roused and inter[286] ested you, because I was so unlike them. Had you not been really amiable, you would have...
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Desire and Domestic Fiction: A Political History of the Novel

Nancy Armstrong - Desire in literature - 1987 - 300 pages
...fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking...and interested you, because I was so unlike them'" (p. 262). Although she wins Darcy's heart on the basis of what amounts to a direct violation of the...
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Desire and Domestic Fiction: A Political History of the Novel

Nancy Armstrong - Desire in literature - 1987 - 300 pages
...of verbal aggression, Elizabeth challenges his power to define her and answers the question herself: "'The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of...deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and...
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Jane Austen's Art of Memory

Jocelyn Harris - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 284 pages
...the assiduities, of this trifling man' (II.320), Elizabeth combines, copies and partially inverts. The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention . . . I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them ... in your heart, you thoroughly...
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Erotic Faith: Being in Love from Jane Austen to D. H. Lawrence

Robert M. Polhemus - Literary Criticism - 1990 - 363 pages
...that liveliness of mind drew him to fall in love: "You may as well call it impertinence at once. . . . The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference,...and interested you, because I was so unlike them. . . . There — I have saved you the trouble of accounting for it; and really, all things considered,...
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REAL Volume 7 (1991)

Grabes - 1991 - 426 pages
...she originally attracted him because she defied his expectations of how a woman would act toward him: "'You were disgusted with the women who were always...and interested you, because I was so unlike them'" (381 ; vol 3, ch. 18). Instead of "speaking and looking and thinking" according to a male perspective,...
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