Standard Stenography: Being Taylor's Shorthand

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G.M. Coghlan, printer, 1882 - Shorthand - 64 pages

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Page 48 - Kingdom and lordship, power and estate, are a gaudier vocabulary than private John and Edward in a small house and common day's work : but the things of life are the same to both : the sum total of both is the same. Why all this deference to Alfred, and Scanderbeg, and Gustavus ? Suppose they were virtuous : did they wear out virtue ? As great a stake depends on your private act to-day, as followed their public and renowned steps.
Page 47 - Let us never bow and apologize more. A great man is coming to eat at my house. I do not wish to please him; I wish that he should wish to please me. I will stand here for humanity, and though I would make it kind, I would make it true. Let us affront and reprimand the smooth mediocrity and squalid contentment of the times...
Page 47 - We worship it to-day because it is not of to-day. We love it and pay it homage, because it is not a trap for our love and homage, but is self-dependent, self-derived, and therefore of an old immaculate pedigree, even if shown in a young person. I hope in these days we have heard the last of conformity and consistency.
Page 48 - But the man in the street, finding no worth in himself which corresponds to the force which built a tower or sculptured a marble god, feels poor when he looks on these. To him a palace, a statue, or a costly book have an alien and forbidding air, much like a gay equipage, and seem to say like that, "Who are you, Sir?
Page 45 - ... sun ; he had fed year after year on the entrails of men. His opinion was, that men had only the appearance of animal life, being really vegetables with a power of motion ; and that as the boughs of an oak are dashed together by the storm, that swine may fatten...
Page 48 - An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man ; as Monachism, of the Hermit Antony ; the Reformation, of Luther ; Quakerism, of Fox ; Methodism, of Wesley ; Abolition, of Clarkson. Scipio^ Milton called " the height of Rome " ; and all history resolves itself very easily into the biography of a few stout and earnest persons.
Page 44 - But when men have killed their prey," said the pupil, "why do they not eat it ? When the wolf has killed a sheep, he suffers not the vulture to touch it till he has satisfied himself. Is not man another kind of wolf i" " Man," said the mother, " is the only beast who kills that which he does not devour, and this quality makes him so much a benefactor to our species.
Page 44 - ... you know how to fix your talons, and how to balance your flight when you are laden with your prey. But you remember the taste of more delicious food ; I have often regaled you with the flesh of man. Tell us, said the young vultures, where man may be found, and how he may be known ; his flesh is surely the natural food of a vulture. Why have you never brought a man in your talons to the nest? He is too bulky...
Page 45 - His opinion was that men had only the appearance of animal life, being really vegetables with a power of motion; and that as the boughs of an oak are dashed together by the storm, that swine may fatten upon the falling acorns, so men are by some unaccountable power driven one against another, till they lose their motion, that vultures may be fed.
Page 44 - We have not the strength of man," returned the mother, "and I am sometimes in doubt whether we have the subtilty; and the vultures would seldom feast upon his flesh, had not nature, that devoted him to our uses, infused into him a strange ferocity, which I have never observed in any other being that feeds upon the earth. Two herds of men will often meet and shake the earth with noise, and fill the air with fire. When you hear noise and see fire, with flashes along the ground, hasten to the place...

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