The Psalms Translated and Explained, Volume 1

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Charles Scribner, 1855 - Bible
 

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Exquisitely elucidated The Psalms Translated and Explained by Alexander was exclusively intended for teachers of the word. Excluding all devotional and practical remarks, he furnishes an exegetical ... Read full review

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Page 213 - O keep my soul, and deliver me : let me not be ashamed ; for I put my trust in thee.
Page 425 - Our God shall come, and shall not keep silence : a fire shall devour before him, and it shall be very tempestuous round about him.
Page 32 - The Lord bless thee, and keep thee : the Lord make his face shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee : the Lord lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace.
Page 356 - When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.
Page 174 - Therefore shalt thou make them turn their back, when thou shalt make ready thine arrows upon thy strings against the face of them.
Page 332 - But he himself went a day's journey into the wilderness, and came and sat down under a juniper tree: and he requested for himself that he might die; and said, It is enough; now, O Lord, take away my life; for I am not better than my fathers.
Page 393 - I will make thy name to be remembered in all generations: therefore shall the people praise thee for ever and ever.
Page 115 - And in all things that I have said unto you be circumspect : and make no mention of the name of other gods, neither let it be heard out of thy mouth.
Page 141 - The Lord rewarded me according to my righteousness: according to the cleanness of my hands hath he recompensed me.
Page 361 - I will say unto God my rock, Why hast thou forgotten me? why go I mourning because of the oppression of the enemy?

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