Museum Criticum: Or, Cambridge Classical Researches

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James Henry Monk, Charles James Blomfield
J. Murray, 1826 - Classical philology
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Page 559 - But are the Atheists of your mind, that they have no books written for them ? Not one of them but believes Tom Hobbes to be a rank one ; and that his corporeal God is a mere sham to get his book printed.
Page 111 - Among the ancients, plain-speaking was the fashion ; nor was that ceremonious delicacy introduced, which has taught men to abuse each other with the utmost politeness, and express the most indecent ideas in the most modest language. The ancients had little of this. They were accustomed to call a spade a spade ; to give every thing its proper name.
Page 159 - Busirite nome, a city which had been seized and fortified against a siege, by great depots of arms and every other kind of munitions, the spirit of revolt having strengthened itself there for a long time, among the impious who are assembled in it, had done much mischief to the temples and inhabitants of Egypt ; and having laid siege to this place, he surrounded it with entrenchments, ditches, and strong walls. The Nile having made a great flood in the eighth year, and as it usually does, inundating...
Page 683 - he explains words with much exactness, and so as to .show that he understood the analogy of the language (b)." "They are upon the whole caleulated," says the bishop of Gloucester, "to give no unfavourable opinion of the state of Greek learning in the university at that memorable crisis.
Page 170 - AOo years which lapsed between the date of the (Rosetta) inscription and that of the oldest books extant, the language appears to have changed much more than those of Greece and Italy have in 2,000. That is, that during the interval of this 500 years, literal language had been introduced and adopted, instead of the picture and symbol they had used before.
Page 111 - ... nor was that ceremonious delicacy introduced, which has taught men to abuse each other with the utmost politeness, and express the most indecent ideas in the most modest language. The ancients had little of this. They were accustomed to call a spade a spade ; to give every thing its proper uame. There is another sort of indecency, which is infinitely more dangerous ; which corrupts the heart without offending the ear.
Page 559 - I cannot think that I should do well to balk the proofs of a Deity to attack either Theists or Jews. The Jews do us little hurt ; and perhaps to bring their objections into the pulpit, and the vulgar language, out of their present obscurity, would not do well : and few would care to hear or read such discourses. Of all the parts of my task, that shall be the last that 1 will meddle with.
Page 200 - But to return to the alphabet ; after having completed this analysis of the hieroglyphic inscription, I observed that the epistolographic characters of the Egyptian inscription, which expressed the words God, Immortal, Vulcan, Priests, Diadem, Thirty, and some others, had a striking resemblance to the corresponding hieroglyphics ; and since none of these characters could be reconciled, without inconceivable violence, to the forms of any imaginable alphabet, I could scarcely doubt, that they were...
Page 605 - And more to lull him in his slumber soft, A trickling stream, from high rock tumbling down, And...
Page 112 - Greece was engaged ; his pointed invectives against the factious and interested demagogues, by whom the populace was deluded, ' who bawl'd for freedom in their senseless mood ; ' his contempt of the useless and frivolous inquiries of the sophists ; his wit and versatility of style ; the astonishing playfulness, originality, and fertility of his imagination ; the great harmony of versification whenever the subject required it, and his most refined elegance of language, — in spite of Dr.

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