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Books Books 1 - 10 of 12 on ... ran into the sea. Nothing was to be seen but the rugged surface of barren rocks,....
" ... ran into the sea. Nothing was to be seen but the rugged surface of barren rocks, upon which myriads of sea-fowls had laid their eggs, and which they were then hatching. These birds were so little accustomed to the sight of any other animal, that,... "
The new sailing directory for the Ethiopic or southern Atlantic ocean - Page 153
by John Purdy - 1844 - 472 pages
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The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Volume 4

Science - 1821
...shingle beach, on which there was a heavy surf beating, and from which a small stream of fresh-water ran into the sea. Nothing was to be seen but the rugged...sea-swallows, and a bird about the size and shape of the common pigeon, and of a milk-white plumage, the only species we met with that was not webfooted....
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The New Monthly Magazine, Volume 3

Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood, William Harrison Ainsworth - 1821
...We landed ou a shingle beach, on which there was a heavy surf beating, and from which a small stream of fresh water ran into the sea. Nothing was to be...ourselves through them. They consisted principally of fourspecies of the penguin ; with albatrosses, gulls, pintadocs, shags, sea-swallows, and a bird about...
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The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, Volume 87

1821
...sea. Nothing was to be seen but the rugged surface of barren rocks, upon which myriads of sea fowls had laid their eggs, and which they were then hatching....penguin ; with albatrosses, gulls, pintadoes, shags, sea swallows, and a bird about the size and shape of the common pigeon, and of a milk white plumage,...
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The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, Volume 87

English literature - 1821
...Nothing was to be seen but the rugged surface of barren rocks, upon which myriads of sea fowls had bud their eggs, and which they were then hatching. These...penguin ; with albatrosses, gulls, pintadoes, shags, sea swallows, and a bird about the size and shape of the common pigeon, and of a milk white plumage,...
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The Investigator, Volumes 3-4

1821
...sea-fowls had laid their eggs, which they were then hatching. These birds were so little accustomedto the sight of any other animal, that, so far from being...seaswallows, and a bird about the size and shape of the common pigeon, and of a milk-white plumage, the only species we met with that was not webfooted....
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New Monthly Magazine, Volume 3

Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood, William Harrison Ainsworth - 1821
...but the rugged surface of barren rocks, upon which myriads of sea-fowls had laid their eggs, :ir..; which they were then hatching. These birds were so...species of the penguin ; with albatrosses, gulls, pintadocs, shags, sea-swallows, and a bird about the size and shape of the common pigeon, and of a...
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The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Volume 4

Science - 1821
...a heavy surf beating, and from which a small stream of fresh-water ran into the sea. Nothing was tq be seen but the rugged surface of barren rocks, upon...they even disputed our landing, and we were obliged to New South Shetland. 347 forcibly to open a passage for ourselves through them. They consisted principally...
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The Edinburgh magazine, and literary miscellany, a new series of The Scots ...

1821
...seen but the rugged surface of barren rocks, upon which myriads of sea fowls had laid their eggs, anil which they were then hatching. These birds were so...forcibly to open a passage for ourselves through them. Tin у consisted principally of four species of the penguin ; with albatrosses, gulls, pintadnos, shags,...
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The Investigator (or, Quarterly magazine) [ed. by W.B. Collyer, T. Raffles ...

William Bengo' Collyer - 1822
...sea-fowls had laid their eggs, which they were then hatching. These birds were so little accustomedto the sight of any other animal, that, so far from being...seaswallows, and a bird about the size and shape of the common pigeon, and of a milk-white plumage, the only species we met with that was not webfooted....
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The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Volume 4

Science - 1821
...ran into the sea. Nothing was to be seen but the rugged surface of ban-en rocks, upon wbjoh EHyriads of sea-fowls had laid their eggs, and which they were...sight of any other animal, that, so far from being igt&gu]atftji ty p^c approach, they even disputed our landing, and yye were obliged; forcibly to open...
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