The new sailing directory for the Ethiopic or southern Atlantic ocean

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R.H. Laurie, 1844 - Aids to navigation - 472 pages
 

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Page 150 - Sandwich Land, was either a group of islands, or else a point of the continent. For I firmly believe that there is a tract of land near the Pole which is the source of most of the ice that is spread over this vast southern ocean.
Page 134 - Having thus finished their little works of defence on the three landsides, they next lay out the whole area in little squares of equal sizes, formed by narrow paths which cross each other at right angles, and which are also made very smooth. At each intersection of these paths an albatross constructs her nest, while in the centre of each little square is a penguin's nest ; so that each albatross is surrounded by four penguins ; and each penguin has an albatross for its neighbour, in four directions.
Page 138 - The town is fortified with an entrenchment, salient angles, and redoubts, which inclose about half a mile in length, and a quarter of a mile in width.
Page 153 - ... ran into the sea. Nothing was to be seen but the rugged surface of barren rocks, upon which myriads of sea-fowls had laid their eggs, and which they were then hatching. These birds were so little accustomed to the sight of any other animal, that, so far from being intimidated by our approach, they even disputed our landing, and we were obliged. forcibly to open a passage for ourselves through them. They consisted principally of four species...
Page 137 - ... wrecked. I know few things more surprising than to see this plant growing and flourishing amidst those great breakers of the western ocean, which no mass of rock, let it be ever so hard, can long resist. The stem is round, slimy, and smooth, and seldom has a diameter of so much as an inch. A few taken together are sufficiently strong to support the weight of the large loose stones, to which in the inland channels they grow attached ; and yet some of these stones were so heavy that when drawn...
Page 137 - I believe, during the voyages of the Adventure and Beagle, not one rock near the surface was discovered which was not buoyed by this floating weed. The good service it thus affords to vessels navigating near this stormy land is evident ; and it certainly has saved many a one from being wrecked. I know few things more surprising than to see this plant growing and flourishing amidst those great breakers of the western ocean, which no mass of rock, let it be ever so hard, can long resist.
Page 423 - In working into this harbour the shore on the main may be approached within two cables' length. This is a fine place for making captive the great leviathan of the ocean, the right whale, great numbers of which strike on this part of the coast about the middle of June. They are in the habit of playing about the reefs of the island, and that which runs from the continental point before mentioned ; and as the south wind generally prevails, there is no difficulty in getting the dead whale alongside of...
Page 84 - The two largest nearly connect with each other, and form a kind of harbour, or place of shelter, for a boat, on the NW side.
Page 318 - ... saline contents of the water, in which case it would be secondary. The probability of a volcanic origin is, I think, small, from the absence, I believe, of any other indications of volcanic action, and from the great extent of the coast along which it has been traced. What is known of the action of vegetable matter upon the sulphates, and the immense quantities of vegetable matter which must be brought by the rivers within the influence of the saline matter of the sea, renders, on the contrary,...
Page 312 - Island, on your starboard ; and when abreast of the south end of that island, haul over for the west shore, taking care to avoid the beds of weeds you will see before you, as they always grow on rocks ; some of which I have found twelve fathoms under water, but it is always best to keep clear of them. The entrance to the large harbour, or Port Clerke, is just to the north of some low rocks lying off a point on Shag Island. This harbour lies in W. by...

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