Sailing Directions for the West Coasts of Mexico and Central America: From the United States to Colombia Including the Gulfs of California and Panama

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1938 - Pilot guides - 430 pages

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Page 26 - The highest and lowest of these lights shall be red, and the middle light shall be white, and they shall be of such a character as to be visible all round the horizon, at a distance of at least 2 miles.
Page 3 - Department, for the improvement of the means for navigating safely the vessels of the Navy and of the mercantile marine, by providing, under...
Page 378 - Rules and Regulations Governing Navigation of the Panama Canal and Adjacent Waters," as contained in Executive Order No.
Page 5 - Equator. 1907 1. 50 127 Star Identification Tables, giving simultaneous values of declination and hour angle for values of latitude, altitude, and azimuth ranging from 0 to 80 in latitude and altitude and 0 to 180 in azimuth.
Page 26 - ... 6 feet apart. At night two red lights shall be displayed in the same manner. In the case of a small vessel the distance between the balls and between the lights may be reduced to not less than 3 feet if necessary.
Page 25 - A gun or other explosive signal fired at intervals of about a minute. 2. The International Code signal of distress indicated by NC 3. The distant signal, consisting of a square flag, having either above or below it a ball or anything resembling a ball. 4. A continuous sounding with any fog-signal apparatus.
Page 17 - For a boat riding in bad weather from a sea anchor, it is recommended to fasten the bag to an endless line rove through a block on the sea anchor, by which means the oil can be diffused well ahead of the boat and the bag readily hauled on board for refilling, if necessary.
Page 11 - The intrinsic power of a light should always be considered when expecting to make it in thick weather. A weak light is easily obscured by haze, and no dependence can be placed on its being seen. The power of a light can be estimated by its candlepower or order, as stated in the Light Lists, and in some cases by noting how much its visibility in clear weather falls short of the range corresponding to its height.
Page 26 - A vessel of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, when at anchor in a fairway on surveying operations, shall display from the mast during the daytime two black balls in a vertical line and 6 feet apart. At night two red lights shall be displayed in the same manner. In the case of a small vessel the distance between the balls and between the lights may be reduced to 3 feet if necessary.
Page 25 - In the daytime — 1. A gun fired at intervals of about a minute. 2. The International Code signal of distress indicated by N C. 3. The distant signal, consisting of a square flag, having either above or below it a ball, or anything resembling a ball.

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