The Life of William Carey

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Delmarva Publications, Inc., Aug 15, 2015 - Biography & Autobiography - 230 pages

William Carey (17 August 1761 – 9 June 1834) was an English Baptist missionary and a Particular Baptist minister, known as the "father of modern missions." Carey was one of the founders of the Baptist Missionary Society. As a missionary in the Danish colony, Serampore, India, he translated the Bible into Bengali, Sanskrit, and several other languages and dialects.

 

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Contents

Chapter
Chapter Ii
Chapter Iii
Chapter Iv
Chapter V
Chapter Vi
Chapter Vii
Chapter Viii
Chapter Ix
Chapter X
Chapter Xi
Chapter Xii
Chapter Xiii
Chapter Xiv
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

William Carey (17 August 1761 - 9 June 1834) was an English Baptist missionary and a Particular Baptist minister, known as the "father of modern missions." Carey was one of the founders of the Baptist Missionary Society. As a missionary in the Danish colony, Serampore, India, he translated the Bible into Bengali, Sanskrit, and several other languages and dialects. William Carey, the oldest of five children, was born to Edmund and Elizabeth Carey, who were weavers by trade in the village of Paulerspury in Northamptonshire. William was raised in the Church of England; when he was six, his father was appointed the parish clerk and village schoolmaster. As a child he was naturally inquisitive and keenly interested in the natural sciences, particularly botany. He possessed a natural gift for language, teaching himself Latin. At the age of 14, Carey's father apprenticed him to a cobbler in the nearby village of Piddington, Northamptonshire. His master, Clarke Nichols, was a churchman like himself, but another apprentice, John Warr, was a Dissenter. Through his influence Carey would eventually leave the Church of England and join with other Dissenters to form a small Congregational church in nearby Hackleton. While apprenticed to Nichols, he also taught himself Greek with the help of a local villager who had a college education.

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