The Zap Gun

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1966 - Fiction - 252 pages
4 Reviews
Scaldingly sarcastic yet enduringly empathetic, The Zap Gun is Dick’s remarkable novel depicting the insanity of the arms race. Lars Powderdry and Lilo Topchev are counterpart weapons fashion designers for a world divided into two factions–Wes-bloc and Peep-East. Since the Plowshare Protocols of 2002, their job has been to invent elaborate weapons that only seem massively lethal. But when alien satellites hostile to both sides appear in the sky, the two are brought together in the dire hope that they can create a weapon to save the world, a task made all the more difficult by Lars falling in love with Lilo even as he knows she’s trying to kill him.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - deslni01 - LibraryThing

Though a serialized novel, The Zap Gun isn't as dry and long-winded as one would expect. Set in the past-future of 2004, the Cold War still rages on between the West (Wes-Bloc) and the East (Peep-East ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RandyStafford - LibraryThing

My raw reactions on reading this book in 1990 -- spoilers follow: In a certain sense, Dick’s negative assessment of the novel’s first half being utterly unreadable is correct. The opening is boring ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
17
Section 3
26
Copyright

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About the author (1966)

Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his life in California. He briefly attended the University of California, but dropped out before completing any classes. In 1952, he began writing professionally and proceeded to write numerous novels and short-story collections. He won the Hugo Award for the best novel in 1962 for The Man in the High Castle and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel of the year in 1974 for Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. Philip K. Dick died on March 2, 1982, in Santa Ana, California, of heart failure following a stroke.

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